);

2019 ICOHS Consumer & Security Report

ICOHS College School Consumer Disclosure Information

GENERAL CONSUMER INFORMATION TO ALL STUDENTS

International College of Holistic Studies (herein after known as “School,”) is providing consumer information about the School to all current and prospective students through the means of this Consumer Information document, also known as the School Catalog’s ‘Appendix A’. The Consumer Information document, along with the School’s 2016-2018 Catalog, is also available on our internet website, http//icohs.edu. A paper copy of both documents can be provided upon request through our Admissions Office.

It is imperative for students to understand all aspects of this Consumer Information document as well as the School’s Catalog including the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy (SAP) and the relation to any federal student aid that the student may apply for and/or consequences that could result from early withdrawal due to unsatisfactory progress. Federal aid students must carefully read the information provided in this document to understand the rights and responsibilities as a recipient of federal student aid.

The School will annually distribute to all enrolled students, a notice of the availability of the Consumer Information. It is known that the student is responsible for understanding all of the content in the Consumer Information document and how it directly relates to federal student aid.

CONTACT PERSONNEL TO ASSIST WITH CONSUMER INFORMATION

Our Financial Aid and Admission Representatives are knowledgeable of the information contained within this document and are readily available to assist prospective/enrolled students and/or their parents during normal business hours. Our business hours are Monday-Friday 8:30 A.M. – 6:00 P.M. Monday through Thursday and 8:30 A.M. through 5:30 P.M. on Friday.

FINANCIAL AID

For financial aid information you may contact the Financial Aid Coordinator, at 858.581.9460 ext. 8005 for additional questions or email us at financialaid@icohs.edu.

GENERAL INFORMATION

For general School information and/or Admissions you may contact the Director of Admissions at 858.581.9460 ext. 8003 or email at us at Director.Admissions@icohs.edu

SCHOOL FACILITIES

The School is located at 1500 State Street, San Diego, California, 92101. The School is a 22,000 square foot educational facility that is wheelchair accessible and includes the following student resources:

  • Administration Office
  • Classrooms
  • Chakra Halls
  • Computer Lab
  • Student Kitchen
  • Student Lounge
  • Student Massage Clinic
  • Yoga Studio
  • Zen Room

CONSTITUTION DAY

In compliance with the D.O.E. (Department of Education) and in recognition of the constitution, ICoHS (International College of Holistic Studies) recognizes and participates in Constitution Day, September 17, and on behalf of our students provide educational program and/or materials on the day of, or closest weekday.

MISREPRESENTATION POLICY OF TRUTH AND CANDOR

The School, its staff and faculty are committed to maintaining the highest standard of integrity in every aspect of its operations and to assuring complete transparency, candor and accuracy in all of its communications with students, accrediting agencies and the public. Further, the School is using procedures and practices aimed at eliminating errors while communicating with students and the public.

STUDENT RIGHT TO KNOW (PRE-ENROLLMENT INFORMATION)

The most current pre-enrollment information is available to all students and prospective students on the school’s website: www.icohs.edu and provided upon enrollment with the full acceptance letter. The acceptance letter includes weblinks (www.icohs.edu) to the graduation, placement, and certification rates for the most recent award year.

ADMINISTRATION AND FACILITY

The School’s faculty consists of the Executive Director, Compliance Officer, Dean of Student Services, Academic Coordinator, Admissions Coordinator, Financial Aid Coordinator, Registrar’s and Business Offices, and a maximum of one educator per 24 students. A list of members of the faculty can be found in our current catalog.

LICENSURE/ACCREDITATION/ORGANIZATIONS

Note: All licensing/accrediting/approval can be found posted at the school in the Admissions Office.

LICENSURE

International College of Holistic Studies is approved by the:

  • California Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education (BPPE), Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education, 2535 Capitol Oaks Drive, Suite 400, Sacramento California, 95833, Phone: 916.431.6959
  • California Massage Therapy Council (CAMTC), 1 Capitol Mall #800, Sacramento, California, 95814, Phone: 916.669.5336

ACCREDITATION

International College of Holistic Studies is approved by the:

  • Accrediting Council for Continuing Education & Training (ACCET), 1722 N St NW, Washington, D.C., 20036, Phone: 202.955.1113

ENROLLMENT REQUIREMENTS FOR EACH PROGRAM

All programs offered by the School are instructed in the English language only. The following are required for admissions into all programs:

  • Have a High School transcript or diploma with day of graduation posted or equivalent form:
    • G.E.D, and/or college or graduate school transcripts can be accepted in lieu of high school transcript
  • Be 18 years of age or older
  • Complete an interview with an admissions representative
  • Complete a Personal Statement
  • Be fluent in the English language. Students must be proficient in the English Language before registering for their courses. Proof of English proficiency can be provided through one of the following options:
    • TOEFL: Passing score is 60-65 iBT or higher
    • IELTS: Passing overall score of 5 or higher
    • TOEIC: Passing overall score of 550-600 or higher
    • ICoHS English Proficiency Test
    • Students who are in the U.S. may take the English Proficiency test
    • A passing overall score equivalent to CEFR Level B2 is required. There is no cost for the test.
  • Provide picture identification: i.e. driver’s license, passport, etc.
  • Pay the application fee in full.

ENROLLMENT PROCESS

STEP1. SCHEDULE A MEETING WITH AN ADMISSIONS COORDINATOR:

  • Call admissions office to schedule a tour / interview
  • All students admitted are beyond the compulsory age of attendance, The School does not admit ability-to-benefit students

STEP 2. SUBMIT THE ONLINE APPLICATION 

  • Application must be submitted prior to the deadline for the quarter of desired enrollment. Please submit required paperwork including:
    • Personal statement
    • Photo id
    • At least a high school transcript showing completion (a higher level education transcript can be submitted as an alternative)
    • If transfer credit is being requested, official transcripts confirming completed coursework
  • Complete a FAFSA if you plan on using Financial Aid (SCHOOL CODE: #042655-00)
  • ICoHS requests that all applications be submitted one month prior to the start of the quarter to provide sufficient time for the admissions committee to make a decision.

STEP 3. RECEIVE ADMISSION DECISION

  • Full acceptance (required paperwork submitted)
  • Conditional acceptance (required paperwork still outstanding)
  • If the upcoming quarter does not yield an opportunity to enroll (non-acceptance), students are advised regarding next steps

STEP 4. ATTEND VIRTUAL PRE-ORIENTATION

  • A Pre-Orientation link will be sent with your full acceptance letter

STEP 5. SUBMIT ENROLLMENT AGREEMENT and TUITION DEPOSIT or PAYMENT

  • The Financial Aid Advisor is available to provide financing options and other financial information

STEP 6. ATTEND IN-PERSON ORIENTATION

TRANSFER STUDENT POLICY

Transfer credit may be given for courses completed at other post-secondary institutions when such courses are determined to be comparable in scope and content to International College of Holistic Studies own courses. For students seeking a massage therapy license from the state, it is important to note the California Massage Therapy Council (CAMTC) transfer policies listed below. To be eligible for transfer credits, the following criteria must be followed:

  • Transfer credits may be given for courses completed within the past five (5) years.
  • Transfer credits may be awarded for equivalent coursework documented by official transcript that indicates the units or hours of training in each subject. Note that similar course titles (e.g. human anatomy, kinesiology) do not necessarily mean that the course content is equivalent.
  • To receive transfer credits, the student must provide an official school transcript from the previous school(s) and other supporting documentation including: course descriptions and syllabi.
  • All transfer credit requests and required documentation must be submitted to the Admissions Department prior to enrollment but no later than 14 days after the start of school.
  • Only coursework completed at an institution recognized by the U.S. Department of Education or the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. Coursework may be transferable
  • A minimum grade of “C-“ or its equivalent must be earned in the coursework under transfer consideration.
  • A student is allowed to transfer up to half (50%) of the program’s total coursework, subject to the CAMTC policies listed below.
  • Coursework transferred is not included when computing grade point average.
  • Transfer credits will NOT appear on the student’s ICoHS transcript.
    • The student will be responsible for submitting all previous transcripts along with their ICoHS transcript when seeking recognition of their total program hours
  • For applicants whose credits were earned previously at School of Healing Arts, all prior credits earned will be accepted for transfer, pending evaluation and confirmation of the equivalency of the coursework.

A $4.00 fee will be assessed for each transferable hour up to but not exceeding $150.00. Tuition adjustments will be based on the per clock hour value of the tuition charged. The acceptance of transfer credits may affect the amount of Financial Aid for which the student may be eligible. Students will be notified of the status of their transfer credits within two weeks of their transfer request submission.

Students will have two weeks upon notification of their credit transfer to appeal the request. Additional documentation may be requested. ICoHS will respond to appeals within two weeks upon notification of the appeal.

Notice Concerning Transferability of Credits to the 500-hour Massage Therapy Program 

Acceptance of credits does not exempt one from attending classes at International College of Holistic Studies.Students will still be required to attend all scheduled classes in the program.

Notice Concerning Transferability of Credits to the California Massage Therapy Council (CAMTC)

Students seeking to be certified through CAMTC are limited to the amount of credits that may be transferred into ICoHS. Students enrolled in the Massage Therapist, Professional Massage Therapy or Holistic Health Practitioner program and seeking credit transfers should be aware that CAMTC reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to not accept any or all transfer hours. Pursuant to Business and Professions Code section 4604, CAMTC can only consider transfer hours from CAMTC approved schools. Transfer hours may not make up more than 50% of the 500 hours required for certification. CAMTC will consider up to 125 hours of equivalent anatomy and physiology, health and hygiene, and/or business completed at a college or university of the state higher education system.

Please be advised that the transferability of credits a student earns at ICoHS is at the complete discretion of CAMTC. For more information regarding the acceptability of transfer credits for CAMTC certification, please visit CAMTC’s website (www.camtc.org).

Notice Concerning Transferability of Credits & Credentials Earned at ICoHS

The transferability of credits a student earns at ICoHS is at the complete discretion of the institution to which the student may seek transfer. Acceptance of the certificate earned is also at the complete discretion of the institution to which a student may seek to transfer. If the credits a student earns at ICoHS is not accepted at the institution they seek to transfer to, the student may be required to repeat some or all of their coursework at that institution. For this reason, students should make certain that their attendance at ICoHS will meet their educational goals. This may include contacting an institution to which a student may seek to transfer after attending ICoHS to determine if they will award credit for the courses completed. ICoHS will provide an official transcript, syllabi, or course outlines as needed to facilitate the credit transfer process.

Additionally, the transferability of credits a student earns at ICoHS is at the complete discretion of CAMTC.

RE-ENTRY/INTERRUPTIONS

Students who have officially or unofficially withdrawn from one quarter must re-apply to the School for consideration to continue their academic program. Students must perform the following procedures:

  • Complete a new application
  • Pay a non-refundable application fee of $100.00

ICoHS requests that all applications be submitted one month prior to the start of the quarter to provide sufficient time for the admissions committee to make a decision.

NON-DISCRIMINATION STATEMENT

As required by Section 504, 34 Code of Federal Regulations, applicants are considered on the basis of individual merit without regard to disability, gender, sexual orientation, marital status, age, religion, creed, and race, national, ethnic origin or any other status protected by law. This policy applies to admission, employment, financial agreements and all other matters within ICoHS. The SCHOOL administration is designated to coordinate SCHOOL compliance with the requirements of Section 504, as required by 34 Code of the C.F.R. § 104.7(a).

All service members of the armed services will not be denied admissions, based on reasons related to their service.

JOB PLACEMENT (GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT) 

The International College of Holistic Studies maintains contacts in Holistic Health and Massage Therapy industry to assist students in job placement. Employers are encouraged to interview students, and every effort is made to secure a job opportunity for each graduate. Students are prepared in the latter part of training to seek employment. All “Gainful Employment Disclosures” per 34 CFR 668.6(b); 34 CFR 668.412, are available and provided. Placement rates (Performance Fact Sheets), types of employment and Job opportunities are announced and posted at https://icohs.edu

Before pursuing a program at ICoHS, students should be aware that self-employment is a common avenue after completion of their academic programs. While the International College of Holistic Studies cannot guarantee employment for graduates, assistance in finding suitable employment is provided by posting area job openings at the Career Center for students to review. However, the International College of Holistic Studies does follow-up on graduates to help prepare new students for future job placement.

GRADUATION, LICENSURE, AND PLACEMENT RATES

ICoHS Annual Report Rates from 2017

Program Completion Rate Placement Rate Certification Rate
Massage Therapy (MT) 79% 80% 96%
Holistic Health Practitioner (HHP) 86% 100% 67%

PROVISION OF SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

VACCINATION POLICY

SCHOOL does not require vaccination records for admittance to SCHOOL. Because we respect the rights and decisions of all parties concerning childhood vaccines, we do not require these records for admittance.

ICOHS is committed to providing equal access to educational opportunities for all students, in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. As such, ICOHS is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities or other special needs. The campus, classrooms and all facilities are handicap accessible, including the elevator. To request additional accommodations: The school expects students with disabilities to take an active role in communicating their needs since students can best describe their strengths and challenges. Disclosures and requests received at any time will be considered, however the school also recognizes that it is most effective when the disclosures of disabilities are made prior to students arriving on campus. Opportunities to request additional accommodations: Students/prospective students have the option and opportunity to disclose their disability and/or need for accommodation when completing the Entry Assessment Test. If disclosed during the Entry Assessment Test, Student Services will be notified and consult with the student to discuss and determine potential accommodations. If not disclosed during the Entry Assessment Test than the school asks that students/prospective students disclose and request within two weeks prior to starting the program. Early disclosure expedites the school’s review process, and opportunity to provide reasonable accommodations without delay. To submit a disclosure/request for accommodation a student must:

  • Submit the request in writing to Student Services.
  • Provide recent diagnostic documentation (physician’s diagnosis, listing specific accommodations) to Student Services.

Once the appropriate request/documentation has been received, Student Services, Compliance and the Executive Director will review for reasonable accommodation. The student will be notified of the determination, in writing, within 10 days of the submission. If the student does not agree with the determination, they may appeal the decision, within two weeks of the determination, by contacting the Executive Director and submitting all previously requested documents and information. The Executive Director will respond within two weeks of receiving the appeal. Students may contact the Executive Director in the following ways: By Telephone: 858-581-9460 By Mail: ICOHS Executive Director 1500 State Street San Diego CA, 92101

VOTER REGISTRATION

In compliance with the DOE, voter registration applications are supplied at Orientation or Voter Registrations can be downloaded at: (http://www.sos.ca.gov/elections/voter-registration/)

SAFETY REQUIREMENTS

Practice safety by following the universal precautions during all course training sessions including while working with clients during the Practicum course as follows:

  • Wash hands and arms, both before and after each bodywork session
  • Use gloves whenever there is exposure to blood or bodily fluids, such as a cut, wound, etc.
  • Change sheets and face rests after each client to avoid exposure to pathogens

Core best practices include:

  • Practice good oral and bodily hygiene
  • Avoid scents of any kind such as perfume or cologne
  • Remove jewelry, such as bracelets, watches and rings
  • Keep your fingernails short and clean

PHYSICAL DEMANDS PLACED ON THE BODY

You may work long hours. Work schedules may include nights and weekends, and may not include breaks or lunches. Good health and stamina are a must. Most massage industry professionals may be on their feet for long periods of time. There are physical demands placed upon the body during both class and as an employee in the industry, including but not limited to, standing for long periods of time, bending over, lengthy time allowances for services, lifting heavy objects and dexterity.

LICENSING REQUIREMENT

CALIFORNIA STATE CERTIFICATION and BOARD CERTIFICATION is detailed on pages 76 and 77 of the 016-2018 ICoHS Catalog.

COURSES OFFERED, HOURS TO COMPLETION, FEES FOR TUITION & TEXTBOOK/KITS

Schedules

COURSES HRS MAXIMUM PROGRAM LENGTH (WKS.) FT/ PT SCHEDULE HR/WK
PROFESSIONAL MASSAGE THERAPY (PMT) 750 31.2 FT Mornings (Monday through Thursday) 24
HOLISTIC HEALTH PRACTIONER (HHP) 1000 42 FT Mornings (Monday through Thursday) 24

 

Tuition*

 

COURSE REGISTRATION FEE TEXTBOOKS & SUPPLIES TUITION TOTAL
PROFESSIONAL MASSAGE THERAPY (PMT) $100 non-refundable application fee $1,900 $15,750 $17,750
HOLISTIC HEALTH PRACTIONER (HHP-A/HHP-B) TRACKS A and B – BODY WORK and ALTERNATIVE SPECIALTIES $100 non-refundable application fee $2,300 $21,000 $23,400

TEXTBOOK AND SUPPLY POLICIES

Materials and Supplies

Required textbooks and supplies are provided to the students during the first week of each new session.

Massage tables are provided to students at the end of the first month of their start date.

If a student withdraws from the program within the first 14 calendar days of their program start date, the student must return all books and supplies in good condition to the Business Office.

Failure to return all textbooks and supplies or in good condition will be invoiced the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of the textbooks and materials.

Materials and Supplies includes:

  • Textbooks required for the program
  • 1 Massage Kit
  • 3-piece sheet set (x2)
  • 1 notebook
  • 1 ICOHS T-Shirt
  • 1 Massage Table

Textbook Checkout

Students who do not bring text materials to class may be advised by their course instructor to check-out text materials at the Business Office. Depending on inventory availability, Business Office will determine if the student can check-out the text materials.

If sufficient inventory is available, students can check-out by signing for any text materials borrowed (using the textbook checkout list) and return them within seven (7) days. Students must return borrowed text materials within seven (7) days and in good condition. Should a student fail to return or return in good condition, the student will be invoiced the MSRP value of the text material(s).

TEXTBOOK & SUPPLY LIST

* If a course is not listed, the course will use handouts

** Textbooks are subject to change due to text availability and instructor discretion

*** Not all textbooks are available for check-out from the ICoHS library. Textbooks available are indicated with:

**pending

For all classes with a MSG code, please come prepared with a set of sheets and oil/lotion and comfortable clothes.

For all classes with a YOG code, please come prepared with a yoga mat and comfortable clothes

TEXTBOOK AND SUPPLY DISBURSEMENT POLICY

Text books and supplies are included in the cost of tuition. Textbooks and supplies are issued to the student on the first day of class. The textbook and supply items are non-refundable.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

There are many opportunities open to Massage Therapists and Holistic Health Practitioners. SCHOOL prepares all graduates for the licensing exam and entry-level positions for employment in their specific field. Additional industry experience could lead to employment as a staff member in a day spa, chiropractors’ offices, health clubs, wellness centers and as an independent contractors or entrepreneur in the holistic health field.

COMPENSATION EXPECTED

The U.S. Department of Labor provides current (May 2015) job information at http://www.bls.gov. This website includes information by job position to include state & national wages, occupation profiles/descriptions, state & national trends, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed for each position. As reported by the US Dept. of Labor, state & national median wages for massage and holistic health-related positions are as follows:

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

http://www.bls.gov/ooh/occupation-finder.htm?pay=&education=Postsecondary+non- degree+award&training=None&newjobs=&growth=&submit=GO

31-9011 MASSAGE THERAPISTS

http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes319011.htm

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/massage-therapists.htm

O*NET RESOURCE CENTER

The O*NET program is the nation’s primary source of occupational information. Central to the project is the O*NET database, containing information on hundreds of standardized and occupation-specific descriptors. The database, which is available to the public at no cost, is continually updated by surveying a broad range of workers from each occupation.

O*NET CODES

MASSAGE THERAPIST:

https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00

IPED STATISTICS*

The College Navigator website (http://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator) provides current and prospective students information about student body diversity, including the percentage of enrolled, full-time students in the following categories:

Male / Female

Self-identified members of a major racial or ethnic group Federal Pell Grant recipients

The College Navigator website also gives information concerning student services, students with disabilities, career placement during and after enrollment and transfer of credit from other academies, retention, licensure, graduation and placement rates

*The International College of Holistic Studies is in process of being included in IPED statistics because the school was only recently approved for Title IV (November 2017).

NATIONAL CENTER FOR EDUCATION STATISTICS (CIP CODE 2010)

HOLISTIC HEALTH

https://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/cipcode/cipdetail.aspx?y=55&cipid=89039

MASSAGE THERAPY / THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE:

https://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/cipcode/cipdetail.aspx?y=55&cipid=87830

YOGA TEACHER TRAINING / YOGA THERAPY

https://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/cipcode/cipdetail.aspx?y=55&cipid=87692

Bureau of Labor Statistics May 2017 Report lists California as the #1 state with the highest employment level in the Massage Therapist occupations. In the state of California, Massage Therapists and Holistic Health Practitioner graduates in entry level positions may earn minimum wage or greater from gratuities, however, the average hourly wage is $19.95 or annual wage of $41,500. Some spas now offer benefits resulting in higher earnings.

STUDENT BODY DIVERSITY

Full Time active students during 2016 (Jan 1, 2013-December 31, 2016)

 

Female Male
African American 2 7
American Indian or Alaskan Native 0 0
Asian 7 3
Caucasian 45 22
Hispanic 13 8
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 2 1
Two or More Races 12 1
Unknown 10 5
Unduplicated Head Count 91 47

 

Pell Grant Recipients = 0 (Will be updated through IPED when available)

COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT POLICY

The purpose of the Copyright Infringement Policy is to comply with copyright law for the use of copyrighted material. In addition, this policy seeks to make aware to all users the seriousness as well as possible consequences for unauthorized use of copyrighted material. The School strictly prohibits any and all of the following: copyright, trademark, patent, trade secret or other intellectual property infringement, including but not limited to using any copyrighted names, text or images, offering pirated computer programs or links to such programs, serial or registration numbers for software programs, copyrighted music, etc., as policy on the use of copyrighted material on the Institution’s computer system and network.

The School respects the copyrights of those involved in creating and distributing copyrighted material, including music, movies, software, and other literary and artistic works. It is the policy of the School to comply with copyright law. If users utilize copyrighted materials for educational, instructional, research, scholarship and like areas, The School will follow the legal doctrine of fair use currently a part of the copyright law. The School’s students and faculty will not make unauthorized copies of copyrighted material on or using the School’s computer system, network or storage media. Also, The School’s faculty and students will not store unauthorized copies of copyrighted works using the School’s system, network and/or storage media. The School’s faculty and students should not download, upload, transmit, make available or otherwise distribute copyrighted material without authorization using the School’s computer system, network, and Internet access or storage media. This is inclusive of utilizing unlicensed/unauthorized peer-to-peer file services that would promote copyright infringement. The School reserves the right to monitor its computer systems, networks and storage media for compliance with this policy, at any time, without notice, and with or without cause. Additionally, the School reserves the right to delete from its computer systems and storage media, or restrict access to, any seemingly unauthorized copies of copyrighted materials it may find, at any time and without notice. Users who violate this policy are subject to disciplinary action as appropriate under the circumstances. Such disciplinary action may include termination, expulsion and other legal actions. For more information, please see the website of the US Copyright Office, www.copyright.gov.

CAMPUS SECURITY ACT INFORMATION DISCLOSURE ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT

Under the Crime Awareness Campus Security Act of 1990, as amended by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act), we are required to provide all students and faculty with the following safety information about our campus. This Annual Security Report has also been updated to reflect recent changes in crime reporting, policies and procedures required by the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA) effective July 1, 2015.

International College of Holistic Studies is committed to providing safety to all of its students, faculty, and staff. If a crime happens to the student or the student’s property or if there is an emergency occurring on campus, report the incident to a facilitator or owner immediately. That individual will assist the student or guest in reporting the crime to the local police or other appropriate security force

International College of Holistic Studies will provide students, faculty, and staff with a copy of this crime report from the previous calendar year by October 1st of the following year. Statistics will be gathered from the local police and compiled in the annual report. To access crime reports and/or Clery Act Campus Crime Reports directly from the City of San Diego, use this link:

https://www.sandiego.gov/police/services/statistics

The report will show the number of incidents on campus, including International College of Holistic Studies parking lot and adjacent streets. At any time, statistics can be accessed from International College of Holistic Studies Admissions Office.

Although International College of Holistic Studies does not employ security Officers, International College of Holistic Studies has a working relationship with the local police who are able to support and provide services promptly in the event of an incident. We encourage accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes to the local police.

 

TIMELY WARNING

In the event that a situation or a crime occurs, either on or off campus, that, in the judgment of the Campus Security Support Team (CST), constitutes a threat to students and employees, a campus wide “timely warning” will be issued. The warning will be issued through the campus by text message and by verbal communications, emails and social media and signage to staff, students and guests. If the situation or crime occurs on campus and represents an immediate threat to the health of safety of students or employees, the institution will follow the Emergency Notification procedures contained in the Emergency Procedures document.

Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should report the circumstances to the CST, by phone at either (858) 634-2647 [Emergency Number] or our main on-campus phone of (858) 581-9460 or in person on campus at our address, which is 1500 State Street, San Diego, CA 92101

DRUG FREE CAMPUS

The Drug Prevention Policy and its effectiveness are reviewed yearly by the International College of Holistic Studies. If changes are necessary, faculty will be notified at the next faculty meeting. The new policy will be presented in written form to all students and staff. The International College of Holistic Studies prohibits the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by faculty and students on the property or as part of any International College of Holistic Studies activities. Furthermore, as an educational institution, students and faculty under the influence of any psychoactive substances impacting perception, mood or consciousness are not allowed on campus. In some cases, conviction of drug-related offenses could result in the student’s ineligibility of Title IV funding or other forms of financial assistance.

The International College of Holistic Studies will expel students and terminate faculty involved in unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol on International College of Holistic Studies premises and will refer such cases to the proper authorities for prosecution. Furthermore, students and staff who present as under the influence of any psychoactive substances will receive a warning and formal documentation will be included in their student or employee records, even if possession or distribution is not involved. A second occurrence of being under the influence of a psychoactive substance is subject to expulsion or termination of employment and will be decided by a panel of the senior administration consisting of the Executive Director, Compliance Officer and the Dean of Student Services.

Faculty and students may be reinstated upon completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program. If an arrest for drug or alcohol related incidences occurs off site, the student/faculty is required to inform the International College of Holistic Studies so that the International College of Holistic Studies can assist with providing resources to aid the student/faculty member. As a condition of employment, faculty and staff must notify the International College of Holistic Studies of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in the workplace no later than five days after such conviction. The International College of Holistic Studies policy supports and enforces state underage drinking and illicit drug laws. The Quarterly Review method of distribution for newly enrolling students is during the orientation process. The Quarterly Review method of distribution for all current students is handing out a copy in the class. To ensure all students will receive a copy, students who are absent on the day of distribution will be handed a copy by their facilitator upon the student’s return. The facilitator will take an attendance role call during class to determine missing students. The Quarterly Review distribution for faculty is annually during a faculty meeting. Absent CST Members will be given a copy upon their return. If new faculty joins after the annual distribution, all drug related material will be given as part of the new hire program.

DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION

The International College of Holistic Studies will immediately contact law enforcement officials to report all unlawful activity. The health risks of illicit drugs and alcohol abuse requires the International College of Holistic Studies to provide education and referrals for faculty and students. The International College of Holistic Studies provides education and distribution of materials annually and refers faculty and students to local services. Health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol include:

  • Impaired mental and physical health, neurological disease/damage, memory and intellectual performance interference, mental and physical depression, uncontrollable violence, impulsive behavior, convulsive seizures, homicide, suicide, cardiac disease or damage, cardiovascular collapse or heart failure, gastrointestinal disease or damage, ulcers or erosive gastritis, anemia, liver and pancreatic disease, liver failure or pancreatitis, deteriorating relationships, and death.

Resources for drug and alcohol abuse prevention include:

  • The Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Hotline is open 24 hours (800) 252-6465.
  • The Cocaine Hotline (800) 444-9999 is open 24 hours a day.
  • The National Institute on Drug Abuse Hotline is available 8:00 AM to 2:00 AM, Monday through Friday and 11:00 AM to 2:00 AM, on weekends (800) 662-4357.
  • You may also contact the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs at 916-322-6690 for further information on drug and alcohol rehabilitation centers in our area.

We recommend that any sign of drug use in either staff or students immediately notify the Center Director. Caution must be observed not to wrongly accuse a person suspected of taking drugs as an improper accusation could lead to embarrassment both to the individual and the International College of Holistic Studies.

Once it has been determined by the management team that assistance to overcome a drug problem is a necessity, the individual and his/her family should be counseled on the need for assistance. Records must be maintained of any counseling provided to the individual. There are clinics in the International College of Holistic Studies ‘ vicinity which can render assistance. Treatment must be an expense borne by the patient.

The International College of Holistic Studies can only offer advice in a limited manner. If the individual is in immediate danger of harming either him/herself or others, local law authorities should be immediately contacted. Staff and students who violate these standards of conduct subject themselves to disciplinary actions.

Students are reminded that as a pre-condition to accepting a Federal Pell Grant that they sign a certificate stating they would not engage in the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of a controlled substance during the period covered by a Federal Pell Grant. A Federal Pell Grant recipient convicted of a criminal drug offense resulting from a violation occurring during the period of enrollment covered by the Federal Pell Grant must report the conviction, in writing, within 10 calendar days of the conviction, to the Director, Grants and Contracts Service, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Room 3073, FOB-6, Washington, DC 20202-4571. Failure to report the conviction could lead to LS&T or debarment.

Staff, upon being hired by ICoHS receives a briefing and acknowledgment in writing that they understand the provisions of the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988. Employees must notify the Director of the International College of Holistic Studies in writing of a conviction of a criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace, within five (5) days after receiving the conviction. Disciplinary action will take place within 30 days of notification and can range from a letter of admonishment, suspension from International College of Holistic Studies or work, and/or enrollment in a rehabilitation program, to termination from either International College of Holistic Studies or employment.

FEDERAL PENALTIES AND SANCTIONS FOR ILLEGAL POSSESSION OF A CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE

The Federal Drug Trafficking Penalties are as follows:

  • 21. U.S.C. 844(a)
    • (a) 1st conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 5 grams.
    • (b) 2nd crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 3 grams.
    • (c) 3rd or subsequent crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 1 gram.
    • 1st conviction: Up to 1 year imprisonment and fined at least $1,000 but not more than $100,000, or both.
    • After 1 prior drug conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed 2 years and fined at least $2,500 but not more than $250,000 or both.
    • After 2 or more prior drug convictions: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed 3 years and fined at least $5,000 but not more than $250,000 or both.
    • Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine: Mandatory at least 5 years in prison, not to exceed 20 years and fined up to $250,000 or both, if:
  • 21. U.S.C. 853(a) (2) and 881(a) (7)
    • Forfeiture of personal and real property used to possess or to facilitate possessions of a controlled substance if that offense is punishable by more than 1 year imprisonment. (See special sentencing provisions re: crack)
    • 21. U.S.C. 881(a) (4)
      • Forfeiture of vehicles, boats, aircraft, or any other conveyance used to transport or conceal a controlled substance.
  • 21. U.S.C. 844a
    • Civil fine of up to $10,000 (pending adoption of final regulations).
  • 21. U.S.C. 853a
    • Denial of Federal benefits, such as student loans, grants contracts, and professional and commercial licenses, up to 1 year for first offense, up to 5 years for second and subsequent offenses. 18. U.S.C. 922(g) Ineligible to receive or purchase a firearm. Miscellaneous Revocation of certain Federal licenses and benefits, e.g., pilot licenses, public housing tenancy, etc., are vested within the authorities of individual Federal agencies. Note: These are only Federal penalties and sanctions. Additional State penalties and sanctions may apply.

OTHER DRUG POSSESSION PENALTIES

  • There are numerous legal sanctions under local, state, and federal laws which can be used to punish violators.
    • Penalties can range from suspension, revocation and denial of a driver’s license, to 20-50 years imprisonment at hard labor without benefit of parole.
    • Property may be seized.
    • Community service may be mandated.
    • Examples of penalties found in federal law for drug trafficking are included in the section above.
  • Recent federal anti-drug laws affect a number of areas in everyone’s lives.
    • Students could lose eligibility for financial aid and could be denied other federal benefits, such as Social Security, Retirement, Welfare, Disability, and Veterans Benefits.
    • The Department of Housing and Urban Development, which provides funds to states and communities for public housing, now has the authority to evict residents and members of their household who are involved in drug-related crimes on or near the public housing premises.
    • Businesses could lose federal contracts if the company does not promote a drug-free environment.
    • Finally, a record of a felony or conviction in a drug-related crime may prevent a person from entering certain careers.

The laws of the State of California are adequate to protect the innocent, but stringent enough to ensure that persons involved with illegal dealing of drugs or excessive use of alcohol can be adequately punished. For example:

  • A small amount of drugs found on a person may lead to an arrest which could require the person to make payment of all court costs as well as participate in mandatory community service.
  • A person found with drugs with the intention to distribute could be imprisoned. A person found to be intoxicated while driving could be forced to pay court costs, lawyer’s fees, participate in community service, receive an increase in the cost of automobile insurance or even lose their driver’s license and end up in prison.

In addition to local and state authorities, the federal government has four agencies employing approximately 52,500 personnel engaged in fighting illicit drugs. These agencies are:

  • The Drug Enforcement Agency, U.S. Customs Service, Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the U.S. Coast Guard.

Here are a few legal facts of which you should be aware.

  • It is a crime to hold someone else’s drugs. It is a crime to sell fake drugs.
  • You can be arrested if you are in a house (or on-site at International College of Holistic Studies) and/or where people are using drugs, even though you are not.
  • You can be charged with possessing drugs even if it is not on you.
  • You are considered to possess, under legal terms of “constructive possession”, drugs that are in your purse, car, or house.

Drug Abuse is the utilization of natural and/or synthetic chemical substances for non-medical reasons to affect the body and its processes, the mind and nervous system and behavior. The abuse of drugs can affect a person’s physical and emotional health and social life. Alcohol is the most abused drug in the United States. Drugs can be highly addictive and injurious to the body as well as one’s self. People tend to lose their sense of responsibility and coordination. Restlessness, irritability, anxiety, paranoia, depression, acting slow moving, inattentiveness, loss of appetite, sexual indifference, comas, convulsions, even death can result from overuse or abuse of drugs. Not only does the person using the drug subject himself to all sorts of health risks, drug use can and, in many instances does, cause grief and discomfort to innocent people. A drug-dulled brain, for example, affects the wide range of skills needed for safe driving, such as thinking. Further, reflexes are slowed, making it hard for drivers to respond to sudden, unexpected events. Alcohol-related highway deaths are the top killer of 15-24 year olds.

SEX OFFENSES

Please contact the San Diego Police Department to report any sex offenses immediately. The seriousness of this offense makes is vital to preserve evidence for proof of the criminal offense. The International College of Holistic Studies will provide assistance in any way possible. Information on counseling or referrals centers is released to faculty and students upon request. If a sex offense happens where both the accused and the accuser attend the International College of Holistic Studies, both the accuser and the accused:

  • Are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during a disciplinary proceeding and Will be informed of International College of Holistic Studies final determination of any International College of Holistic Studies disciplinary proceeding with respect to the alleged sex offense and any sanction that is imposed against the accused and the dismissal that may occur following a final determination of said proceedings regarding rape, acquaintance rape, or other forcible or no-forcible sex offenses.
  • International College of Holistic Studies will work with students to change a student’s academic situation (i.e., allowing the student to take a leave of absence, allowing the student to enroll in a later program, etc.) If the change is requested by the victim and the change is reasonably available.
  • International College of Holistic Studies does not provide any programs on campus regarding sexual assault prevention. If students or faculty wishes to learn more about the prevention of sexual assault, contact the Police Department.
  • Individuals wishing to learn additional information about registered sex offenders may check website information for San Diego here: https://www.meganslaw.ca.gov/. .

INFORMATION FOR CRIME VICTIMS ABOUT DISCIPLINARY PROCEEDINGS

Information will be disclosed upon written request, to any alleged victim of any crime of violence or non- forcible sex offense, regarding the results of any disciplinary proceedings conducted by International College of Holistic Studies against a student who is the alleged perpetrator of such crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of the crime or offense, the information shall be provided upon request, to the next of kin of the alleged victim.

EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION

An emergency notification is an immediate notification of an unforeseen combination of circumstances that calls for immediate action. The faculty has received training on how to handle a pending emergency and trained in the following Emergency Code.

CODES FOR AN EMERGENCY SITUATION

Code Lock Down: A lock down situation has occurred. Faculty, students and guests are to remain calm and do not leave International College of Holistic Studies.

Code Evacuate Front: Indicates a need to evacuate International College of Holistic Studies immediately and exit through a front entrance only.

Code Evacuate Garage: Indicates a need to evacuate through the garage’s alley entrance only.

Code Dangerous: Indicates a dangerous situation has occurred outside International College of Holistic Studies and no one is allowed to leave International College of Holistic Studies.

Code Hostage: A hostage, criminal or terrorist threat / situation

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES

At the time of an urgent unanticipated event, CST Members will assess the situation to determine the significance of an emergency. Without delay, the CST will take into account the safety of its faculty, students, guests and community neighbors. The CST will identify / determine the extent of the emergency and enact appropriate means of notifications. The CST will respond by assisting any victims(s), respond to/or contain the emergency at hand and diffuse the dangerous situation if possible. The CST will determine the extent of information that needs to be released and will disseminate to faculty, students, and guests / public as appropriate. In the event of a dangerous situation and without delay, the CST will assess the situation and will contact authorities or determine the course of action in order to protect the entire International College of Holistic Studies population.

CST will determine means of notification through but not limited to verbal communications, intercom broadcast system, cell phones, emails and text, social media and signage to deliver emergency messages. If necessary a member of the CST will notify the radio and local television stations. The verbal/written communication will include the type or types of emergency and steps for the emergency situation.

The International College of Holistic Studies will provide the Fire Department and the Police Department with a floor plan of the building. The administration will also notify these agencies of any new construction, long-term functions or any other events which may affect routing or access to the campus. In addition to floor plans, the Police Department, Fire Department, and other local emergency officials are encouraged to tour and walk through the campus regularly.

At least annually during regular class sessions, the faculty will conduct an announced or unannounced test. The test(s) are documented by dates, times, and whether the exercise was announced or unannounced. The results are publicized in the Emergency Procedures document. The testing reminds faculty and students of procedures necessary for the security, safety and crime prevention on and off campuses.

Annually San Diego Police Department will speak on practicing safety for faculty and student members. Faculty and students complete a tour of the International College of Holistic Studies, locating fire extinguishers and exits. They are informed of what to do in case of an emergency.

Roll call will be taken as soon as reasonably possible to ensure all faculty and students has been accounted for at the time of the emergency.

STATISTICS FROM LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES

The International College of Holistic Studies does not employ security officers but does have a direct working relationship with the San Diego Police Department. San Diego Police Department provides prompt service and are able to support the International College of Holistic Studies with any crime issues. We encourage accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes to the San Diego Police Department.

If for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statics a student would like to report a crime on a voluntary, confidential basis they can do so through the CST.

Annually, the International College of Holistic Studies collects and reviews crime statistics from:

  • School Crime Log
  • Police Department
  • State Police

UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS

The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program has been the starting place for law enforcement executives, students of criminal justice, researchers, members of the media, and the public at large seeking information on crime in the nation. The program was conceived in 1929 by the International Association of Chiefs of Police to meet the need for reliable uniform crime statistics for the nation. In 1930, the FBI was tasked with collecting, publishing, and archiving those statistics.

FBI- Federal Bureau of Investigation (http://www.fbi.gov)

THE DAILY CRIME LOG

International College of Holistic Studies updates and keeps a Daily Crime Log binder. The binder is kept at the ICoHS (International College of Holistic Studies) Front Office desk for all CST members and the public to access. Members of the CST team maintain the log.

The report at a minimum denotes the nature of the crime, date and time when the crime occurred, the general location of the crime and the disposition of the complaint, if known.

Disposition is defined as, “pending”, “judicial”, “referral “or criminal arrest”. Sample:

Table Pending

EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND EVACUATION PROCEDURES

Prior to Preparing for an Emergency

International College of Holistic Studies communicates through verbal communications; cell phones, emails and text, social media, and signage to deliver emergency messages. If necessary a member of the CST will notify the radio and local television stations to confirm significant emergency or dangerous situations involving immediate threats, to the health or safety of faculty and students occurring on the campus.

Basic Emergency Kit

International College of Holistic Studies does supply a “BASIC EMERGENCY KIT” that may include the items listed below:

A basic emergency supply kit could include the following recommended items:

  • Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Dust mask to help filter contaminated air.
  • Plastic sheeting and duct tape to create a shelter
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Local maps
  • Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger

Evacuation Guidelines

There may be conditions under which you will decide to get away or there may be situations when you are ordered to leave.

Follow these guidelines for evacuation:

  • If you have a car, keep a full tank of gas in it if an evacuation seems likely.
  • Keep a half tank of gas in it at all times in case of an unexpected need to evacuate. Gas stations may be closed during emergencies and unable to pump gas during power outages.
  • Become familiar with alternate routes and other means of transportation out of your area.
  • Leave early enough to avoid being trapped by severe weather.
  • Follow recommended evacuation routes. Do not take shortcuts; they may be blocked.
  • Be alert for road hazards such as washed-out roads or bridges and downed power lines.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas.
  • If you do not have a car, plan how you will leave if needed: make arrangements with family, friends or your local government.

If Time Allows:

  • Call or email your family.
  • Secure International College of Holistic Studies by closing and locking doors.
  • Unplug electrical equipment such as radios, televisions and small appliances. Leave freezers and refrigerators plugged in unless there is a risk of flooding. If there is damage to International College of Holistic Studies and you are instructed to do so, shut off water, gas and electricity before leaving.
  • Leave a note telling others when you left and where you are going.
  • Wear sturdy shoes and clothing that provides some protection such as long pants, long-sleeved shirts and a cap.

In Case Of Serious Accident or Illness:

Call 9-1-1
Do not move sick or injured person(s).
Be careful to avoid personal contact with any body fluids such as blood, vomit, or saliva. Stay with the victim and reassure her/him that help is on the way.

Power Failure

Remain calm Do not move
Await instructions from CST
If instructed to evacuate, use designated emergency exits ONLY.

CRIME STATISTICS

Campus Security Act Information Disclosure – Under the Crime Awareness Campus Security Act of 1990, as amended by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act), we are required to provide the student with the following safety information about our campus. This Annual Security Report has also been updated to reflect recent changes in crime reporting, policies and procedures required by the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA). The International College of Holistic Studies is committed to providing a violence-free campus.

Student disclosure of Annual Crime Statistics – The International College of Holistic Studies agrees to comply and provide all faculty and students a copy of the campus security report at the beginning of each calendar year and to all prospective students’ enrolling at International College of Holistic Studies. The report will include the previous calendar year statistics to comply with the consumer reporting requirement of the most recent 3 completed calendar years.

Statistics will be gathered from the San Diego Police Department/daily crime logs and compiled in the disclosure. These same statistics will be entered into our annual security report and entered on the Web-based data collection prior to October 1st of each year.

 

ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT
ICOHS College
1500 State Street, San Diego, CA 92101
CAMPUS CRIME STATISTICS
October 1, 2019
ICOHS College provides its students and employees an Annual Security Report.  In accordance with the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990, the school has gathered crime statistics from January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2018.  Included below are reportable criminal offenses and violations that occurred on campus and/or public property. “On campus” is defined as buildings or property owned or controlled by the institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in a manner related to the institution’s educational purpose. “Public property” is defined as property that is located within the same reasonably contiguous geographic areas of the campus, like a sidewalk, street or public parking lot, that is adjacent to a facility owned or controlled by the institution for purposes related to the institution’s educational purposes. The academy does not have any non-campus buildings or property.  The campus security policy is available for review or copy during normal business hours by submitting a request to the Compliance Officer or Campus Safety Officer or online at www.icohs.edu.
Offense   On Campus Property – 1500 State Street, San Diego, CA 92101   On Public Property
2016 2017 2018 2016 2017 2018
Murder/non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rape 0 0 0 0 0 0
Fondling 0 0 0 0 0 0
Incest 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory Rape 0 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated assault 0 0 0 0 0 1
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0 0
Motor vehicle theft 0 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hate Crimes   On Campus Property – 1500 State Street, San Diego, CA 92101   On Public Property (Combined Data)
2016 2017 2018 2016 2017 2018
Murder/non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rape 0 0 0 0 0 0
Fondling 0 0 0 0 0 0
Incest 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory Rape 0 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated assault 0 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0 0
Motor vehicle theft 0 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0 0
Larceny-theft 0 0 0 0 0 0
Simple Assault 0 0 0 0 0 0
Intimidation 0 0 0 0 0 0
Destruction/damage/vandalism of property 0 0 0 0 0 0
VAWA Offenses   On Campus Property – 1500 State Street, San Diego, CA 92101   On Public Property (Combined Data)
2016 2017 2018 2016 2017 2018
Domestic Violence 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dating Violence 0 0 0 0 0 0
Stalking 0 0 0 0 0 0
Arrests and Referrals for Disciplinary Action   On Campus Property – 1500 State Street, San Diego, CA 92101   On Public Property (Combined Data)
2016 2017 2018 2016 2017 2018
Weapons: Carrying, Possessing, Etc. 0 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Abuse Violations 0 0 0 0 0 0
Liquor Law Violations 0 0 0 0 0 0

CRIME DEFINITIONS

The definitions listed below are used by International College of Holistic Studies to classify the criminal offenses listed in the above reported statistics:

Advisor: Any individual who provides the accuser or accused support, guidance, or advice

Aggravated Assault/Battery: An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or substantial bodily injury. This type of assault may be accompanied by the use of a weapon or other means likely to produce death or great bodily harm. (It is not necessary that injury result from an aggravated assault when a gun, knife, or other weapon is used which could and probably would result in serious personal injury if the crime were successfully completed).

Arson: Any willful or malicious burning or attempting to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle, aircraft, personal property of another, etc.

Awareness programs: Community-wide or audience specific programming, initiatives, and strategies that increase audience knowledge and share information and resources to prevent violence, promote safety, and reduce perpetration

Burglary: The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft. For reporting purposes, this definition includes: unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or felony; breaking and entering with intent to commit a larceny; housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.

Bystander intervention: Safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking Bystander intervention includes:

  • Recognizing situations of potential harm
  • Understanding institutional structures and cultural conditions that facilitate violence, overcoming barriers to intervening, identifying safe and effective intervention options, and taking actions to intervene

Criminal Homicide– Murder and non-negligent manslaughter: The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another. Negligent manslaughter: The killing of another person through gross negligence.

Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. For the purposes of this definition—

  • Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. (
  • Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence. Any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Destruction, Damage Or Vandalism To Property: To willfully or maliciously destroy, injure, disfigure, or deface any public or private property, real or personal, without the consent of the owner or person having custody or control by cutting, tearing, breaking, marking, painting, drawing, covering with filth, or any other such means as may be specified by local law.

Domestic Violence: A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed (A) by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim; (B) by a person with whom the victim shares a child I common, (C) by a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, (D) by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred, or (E) by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

Drug Law Violation: The violation of laws prohibiting the production, distribution, and/or use of certain controlled substances and the equipment or devices utilized in their preparation and/or use. The unlawful cultivation, manufacture, distribution, sale, purchase, use, possession, transportation, or importation of any controlled drug or narcotic substance. Arrests for violation of state and local laws relating to unlawfully possessing, selling, using, growing, manufacturing and making narcotic drugs.

Embezzlement, confidence games, forgery, worthless checks, etc., are excluded.

Hate Crimes: A crime reported to local police agencies or to a campus security authority that manifests evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the perpetrator’s bias against the victim. For purposes of this section, the categories of bias include the victim’s actual or perceived race, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity, national origin and disability.

Intimidation: To unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack.

Larceny-Theft (except for motor vehicle theft): The unlawful taking, carrying, leading or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another. Attempted larcenies are included.

Liquor Law Violation: The violation of State or local laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacturing, selling, purchasing, transporting, possessing or use of alcoholic beverages, not including driving under the influence and drunkenness.

Motor Vehicle Theft: The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. For reporting purposes, this crime includes all cases where automobiles are taken by persons not having lawful access even though the vehicles are later abandoned, including joyriding.

Ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns: Programming, initiatives, and strategies that are sustained over time and focus on increasing understanding of topics relevant to and skills for addressing dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking, using a range of strategies with audiences throughout the institution

Primary prevention programs: Programming, initiatives, and strategies informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome that are intended to stop dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking before they occur through the promotion of positive and healthy behaviors that foster healthy, mutually respectful relationships and sexuality, encourage safe bystander intervention, and seek to change behavior and social norms in healthy and safe direction.

Proceeding: All activities related to a non-criminal resolution of an institutional disciplinary complaint, including, but not limited to, fact finding investigations, formal or informal meetings, and hearings. Proceeding does not include communications and meetings between officials and victims concerning accommodations or protective measures to be provided to a victim.

Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking: Comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies, and campaigns intended to end dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking that:

  • Are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs. And informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and Consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community, and societal levels.

Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking include both primary prevention and awareness programs directed at incoming students and new employees and ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns directed at students and employees.

Prompt, fair, and impartial proceeding: A proceeding that is completed within reasonably prompt timeframes designated by an institution’s policy, including a process that allows for the extension of timeframes for good cause and with written notice to the accuser and the accused of the delay and the reason for the delay; Conducted in a manner that:

  • Is consistent with the institution’s policies and transparent to the accuser and accused;
  • Includes timely notice of meetings at which the accuser or accused, or both, may be present; and
  • Provides timely and equal access to the accuser, the accused, and appropriate officials to any information that will be used during informal and formal disciplinary meetings and hearings; and
  • Conducted by officials who do not have a conflict of interest or bias for or against the accuser or the accused

Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.

Result: Any initial, interim, and final decision by any official or entity authorized to resolve disciplinary matters within the institution

Risk reduction: Options designed to decrease perpetration and bystander inaction, and to increase empowerment for victims in order to promote safety and to help individuals and communities address conditions that facilitate violence

Robbery: The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.

Sexual Assault: Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

Sex Offenses: Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

  • Fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
  • Incest – Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
  • Statutory Rape – Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

Sexual Assault: An offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest or statutory rape as contained herein. Coercing or attempting to coerce any sexual contact or behavior without consent. Sexual abuse includes, but is certainly not limited to, marital rape, attacks on sexual parts of the body, forcing sex after physical violence has occurred, or treating one in a sexually demeaning manner.

Sexual Violence: Any physical sexual acts engaged without the consent of the other person or when the other person is unable to consent to the activity. Sexual violence includes sexual assault, rape, battery, and sexual coercion; domestic violence; dating violence; and stalking.

Simple Assault/Battery: An unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender displays a weapon, nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness.

Stalking: Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person To – (A) Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or (B) Suffer substantial emotional distress. For the purposes of this definition— (A) Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s Property, (B) Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim, and (C) Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling. Any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Weapon Law Violation: The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, concealment, or use of firearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary devices, and other deadly weapons.

VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN ACT (VAWA)

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act) was amended by the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA). To require International College of Holistic Studies to report on the additional crime categories of Dating Violence, Domestic Violence and Stalking as part of our annual Clery Act crime statistics to the U.S. Department of Education and in this Annual Security Report. The VAWA amendments also require specific additional procedures for all victims of alleged VAWA crimes as well as primary prevention and awareness training for new students and faculty and ongoing prevention and awareness training for current students and faculty. This Annual Security Report has also been updated to reflect these recent changes in the law.

In 1994 Congress passed the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in recognition of the severity of crimes associated with domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. This Act emerged from the efforts of a broad, grassroots coalition of advocates and survivors who informed the work of Congress. In the two decades prior to VAWA, a movement had grown within the United States to respond appropriately to violent crimes against women. Rape crisis centers and women’s shelters were established in localities, and state and local laws had changed. However, the progress had been uneven around the country. VAWA was borne out of the need for a national solution. This Act enhances the investigation and prosecution of violent crimes against women.

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SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND VIOLENCE POLICY SUMMARY

The Clery Act, as amended by VAWA, requires International College of Holistic Studies to include crimes of domestic violence, dating violence and stalking in its annual crime statistics according to the federal definitions in this report. VAWA also requires the International College of Holistic Studies to provide the definitions of dating violence, domestic violence, stalking and consent under California state law. Those definitions are listed below:

STATE LAW DEFINITIONS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, STALKING AND CONSENT

Partners and family members include parents, children, and siblings related by blood, marriage, or adoption; spouses, former spouses, people who have children together, and people of the opposite sex who are dating or who have dated.

Partner or Family Member Assault

In California, a person commits the crime of partner or family member assault (also called domestic violence) by:

  • causing bodily injury
  • negligently causing bodily injury with a weapon, or
  • creating reasonable apprehension of bodily injury against a partner or family member.

People act negligently when they fail to be aware of or consider the risk their behavior poses to others. Negligent behavior is always a gross departure from how a reasonable person would act. For example, firing a gun inside your house and hitting your boyfriend would be negligent and would be considered domestic violence. Other examples of domestic violence include hitting your child and threatening to hit your wife if the threat creates a reasonable fear of injury.

EXAMPLE CODE. Stalking — exemption — penalty. (1) A person commits the offense of stalking if the person purposely or knowingly causes another person substantial emotional distress or reasonable apprehension of bodily injury or death by repeatedly: following the stalked person; or harassing, threatening, or intimidating the stalked person, in person or by mail, electronic communication, or any other action, device, or other method.

This section does not apply to a constitutionally protected activity.

For the first offense, a person convicted of stalking shall be imprisoned in the county jail for a term not to exceed 1 year or fined an amount not to exceed $1,000, or both.

For a second or subsequent offense or for a first offense against a victim who was under the protection of a restraining order directed at the offender, the offender shall be imprisoned in the state prison for a term not to exceed 5 years or fined an amount not to exceed $10,000, or both. A person convicted of stalking may be sentenced to pay all medical, counseling, and other costs incurred by or on behalf of the victim as a result of the offense.

Upon presentation of credible evidence of violation of this section, an order may be granted, as set forth in Title 40, chapter 15, restraining a person from engaging in the activity described in subsection (1).

For the purpose of determining the number of convictions under this section, “conviction” means:

  • a conviction, as defined in 45-2-101, in this state;
  • a conviction for a violation of a statute similar to this section in another state; or
  • a forfeiture of bail or collateral deposited to secure the defendant’s appearance in court in this state or another state for a violation of a statute similar to this section, which forfeiture has not been vacated.
  • Attempts by the accused person to contact or follow the stalked person after the accused person has been given actual notice that the stalked person does not want to be contacted or followed constitutes prima facie evidence that the accused person purposely or knowingly followed, harassed, threatened, or intimidated the stalked person.

Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment can deny or limit, on the basis of sex, the student’s ability to participate in or receive benefits, services or opportunities from the International College of Holistic Studies programs. That makes it a form of sex discrimination prohibited by Title IX. According to the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights, the following criteria is used to define what constitutes sexual harassment:

  • Conduct that is sexual in nature.
  • Conduct that is unwelcome.
  • Conduct that denies or limits a student’s participation in or benefit from an International College of Holistic Studies education program.

Sexual Conduct Defined as Sexual Harassment

  • Making sexual propositions or pressuring someone for sexual favors.
  • Unwelcome sexual advances.
  • Writing graffiti of a sexual nature.
  • Displaying or distributing sexually explicit drawings, pictures or written material.
  • Performing sexual gestures or touching oneself sexually in front of others.
  • Telling sexual or dirty jokes.
  • Spreading sexual rumors or rating other students as to sexual activity or performance.
  • Circulating or showing emails, websites or Facebook pages of a sexual nature.

Please note:

  • Sexual harassment presents itself in different forms depending on the harasser and the nature of the harassment.
  • Anyone on campus can commit sexual harassment (visitors, students, and staff).
  • The conduct may be nonverbal, physical or verbal.
  • Male and female students can be victims and the harasser may also be of the same sex.
  • Sexual harassment may occur on campus or at an off-campus event sponsored by ICoHS such as a field trip or retreat.

Examples of sexual harassment that can occur in an educational setting include:

  • An instructor grading a student’s work conditions the grade on whether or not the student responds to sexual advances.
  • An instructor continually tells off color jokes in the classroom and/or displays images of a sexual nature in the faculty office.
  • A student constantly shares information about other students with whom he has had sexual encounters in a public forum on campus.
  • Students exchange Facebook posts or email of a sexual nature without the consent of the other party.

Sexual Violence

Sexual violence is a form of sexual harassment and includes acts that are criminal in nature and are prohibited by Title IX. Many types of sexual violence may not involve physical contact between the two parties such as sexual harassment, voyeurism, and sexual threats. Some examples of sexual violence that do include physical contact are:

  • Rape
  • Sexual assault.
  • Sexual battery.
  • Sexual coercion.
  • Unwanted touching.
  • Dating violence.
  • Sexually motivated stalking.

When consent is not obtained in advance of a sex act and the act is committed against the victims will or in instances where the victim is unable to give consent due to the effects of alcohol or drugs, such acts constitute sexual violence. A majority of the victims of sexual violence are women and are often victimized when under the influence of alcohol or drugs. The assailant is usually male and usually someone the victim knows. An estimated 20% to 25% of college women and 6.1% of men in the U.S have experiences an attempted or completed rape during their attendance at a college. If you are a victim of sexual violence, there is no need to be afraid or embarrassed, assistance is available. Tell someone you trust, get help and the ongoing care you need.

The Role Alcohol Plays in Sexual Violence On average, at least 50% of campus sexual assaults involve alcohol. It is the primary drug used by perpetrators of sexual violence.

  • Alcohol impairs the perpetrators judgment, so he/she ignores the indicators that a person doesn’t welcome sexual advances.
  • Alcohol impairs the victim so that they don’t recognize the risk of certain sexual encounters and may not be able to resist sexual advances.
  • Perpetrators may use alcohol as an excuse for their inappropriate behavior.
  • Victims who drink have a more difficult time establishing that the perpetrator assaulted them against their will.

What to do when you are a victim of sexual violence:

  • Go to a safe place, away from the perpetrator.
  • Locate a friend, faculty member or International College of Holistic Studies administrator.
  • Contact the Title IX Coordinator.
  • Contact law enforcement when appropriate.
  • Preserve any evidence of the assault, do not bath, comb your hair, change clothes, or use medications. Preserve any bedding or objects the perpetrator may
  • have left behind that may contain evidence of the assault.
  • At the appropriate time seek medical attention, ensure you have no injuries (external or internal) and get information or treatment for STDs, HIV/AIDS and possible pregnancy.
  • Consider having a rape kit done even if you have not decided whether or not to press charges against the perpetrator. This preserves evidence for later.
    Seek counseling support.
  • Take time to consider all legal options and ask questions for clarification.

Sexual Coercion

Using pressure, force alcohol or other drugs to have sexual contact with someone against their will is considered sexual coercion. You may be experiencing it if:

  • You feel pressured by your date to engage in sexual conduct. “If you love me you will have sex with me.”
  • Gifts or social outings are used as leverage to make you feel like you owe your partner sex.
  • There are times you don’t want to have sex but don’t feel like you can say no.
  • You have had a sexual experience that frightened you or left you feeling angry or guilty.
  • You were pressured into having sex without taking precautions because your partner didn’t want to.

If you have had experiences like these then you may be a victim of sexual coercion, a form of sexual violence, and it’s a violation of your rights.

The International College of Holistic Studies is committed to creating and maintaining a community where all individuals who participate in its programs and activities can work and learn together in an atmosphere free of harassment, exploitation, or intimidation. Every member of the community should be aware that the International College of Holistic Studies prohibits sexual harassment and sexual violence, and that such behavior violates both law and International College of Holistic Studies policy. The International College of Holistic Studies will respond promptly and effectively to reports of sexual harassment and sexual violence, and will take appropriate action to prevent, to correct, and when necessary, to discipline behavior that violates this policy. This policy applies to all employees and students. This policy furthers the International College of Holistic Studies commitment to compliance with the law.

POLICY TEXT

  • General
    • International College of Holistic Studies prohibits sexual harassment and sexual violence. Such behavior violates both law and International College of Holistic Studies policy. The International College of Holistic Studies will respond promptly and effectively to reports of sexual harassment and sexual violence and will take appropriate action to prevent, to correct, and when necessary, to discipline behavior that violates this policy.
  • Prohibited Acts
    • This policy prohibits sexual harassment and sexual violence as defined in this policy. Conduct by an employee that is sexual harassment or sexual violence in violation of this policy is considered to be outside the course and scope of employment.
  • Consensual Relationships
    • This policy covers unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature. Consensual romantic relationships between members of the International College of Holistic Studies community are not subject to this policy.
  • Gender Identity, Gender Expression, or Sexual Orientation Discrimination
    • Harassment that is not sexual in nature but is based on gender, gender identity, gender expression, sex- or gender-stereotyping, or sexual orientation also is prohibited by the International College of Holistic Studies nondiscrimination policy if it denies or limits a person’s ability to participate in or benefit from the International College of Holistic Studies educational programs, employment, or services. While discrimination based on these factors may be distinguished from sexual harassment, these types of discrimination may contribute to the creation of a hostile work or academic environment. Thus, in determining whether a hostile environment due to sexual harassment exists, the International College of Holistic Studies may take into account acts of discrimination based on gender, gender identity, gender expression, sex- or gender- stereotyping, or sexual orientation.
  • Retaliation
    • This policy prohibits retaliation against a person who reports sexual harassment or sexual violence, assists someone with a report of sexual harassment or sexual violence, or participates in any manner in an investigation or resolution of a sexual harassment or sexual violence report. Retaliation includes threats, intimidation, reprisals, and/or adverse actions related to employment or education.
  • Dissemination of the Policy, Educational Programs, and Employee Training
    • As part of the International College of Holistic Studies commitment to providing a working and learning environment free from sexual harassment and sexual violence, this policy shall be disseminated widely to the International College of Holistic Studies community through publications, websites, new employee orientations, student orientations, and other appropriate channels of communication. The International College of Holistic Studies, makes preventive educational materials available to all members of the community to promote compliance with this policy and familiarity with International College of Holistic Studies procedures. The International College of Holistic Studies has designated an employee responsible for reporting sexual harassment and sexual violence and makes available prevention training to designated employees.
    • The International College of Holistic Studies Title IX Coordinator is: Gloria Olson / HR. In addition, the International College of Holistic Studies provides training to the Title IX Coordinator and all staff involved as investigators and hearing officers in sexual harassment and sexual violence disciplinary procedures.
  • Reporting Sexual Harassment or Sexual Violence
    • Any member of the International College of Holistic Studies community may report conduct that may constitute sexual harassment or sexual violence to any supervisor, manager, or Title IX Coordinator. Supervisors, managers, and other designated employees are responsible for promptly forwarding such reports to the Title IX Coordinator to review and investigate sexual harassment and sexual violence complaints. Any manager, supervisor, or designated employee responsible for reporting or responding to sexual harassment or sexual violence who knew about the incident and took no action to stop it or failed to report the prohibited act may be subject to disciplinary action.
    • The International College of Holistic Studies has designated the Title IX Coordinator as the person to whom members of the International College of Holistic Studies community can consult for advice and information regarding making a report of sexual harassment or sexual violence. Requests regarding the confidentiality of reports of sexual harassment or sexual violence will be considered in determining an appropriate International College of Holistic Studies response; however, such requests will be considered in the dual contexts of the International College of Holistic Studies obligation to ensure a working and learning environment free from sexual harassment and sexual violence and the rights of the accused to be informed of the allegations and their source. Also, an individual may file a complaint or grievance alleging sexual harassment or sexual violence under the International College of Holistic Studies grievance procedure.
  • Response to Reports of Sexual Harassment or Sexual Violence
    • The International College of Holistic Studies shall provide prompt and effective response to reports of sexual harassment or sexual violence, which may include early resolution, formal investigation and/or targeted prevention training or educational programs.
    • If an individual reports to the International College of Holistic Studies that the individual has been a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, s/he shall be provided with a written explanation of the individual’s rights and options whether the offense occurred on- or off-campus.
    • Upon a finding of sexual harassment or sexual violence, the International College of Holistic Studies may offer remedies to the individual or individuals harmed by the harassment and/or violence consistent with applicable complaint resolution and grievance procedures. Such remedies may include counseling, an opportunity to repeat course work without penalty, changes to student housing assignments, or other appropriate interventions, such as changes in academic, living, transportation, or working situations.
    • Any member of the International College of Holistic Studies community who is found to have engaged in sexual harassment or sexual violence is subject to disciplinary action including dismissal in accordance with the applicable International College of Holistic Studies disciplinary procedure or other International College of Holistic Studies policy. Generally, disciplinary action will be recommended when the conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive that it alters the conditions of employment or limits the opportunity to participate in or benefit from educational programs.

PROCEDURES

  • INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE OF HOLISTIC STUDIES Responsibilities

In accordance with state and federal law, the International College of Holistic Studies shall:

  • Offer sexual harassment prevention training and education to the International College of Holistic Studies community, and provide sexual harassment prevention training and education to each supervisory employee;
  • Offer prevention education materials to all incoming students and new employees, and ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns to the International College of Holistic Studies community, to promote awareness of rape and acquaintance rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, including the definition of consent, options for bystander intervention, and risk reduction awareness information;
  • Offer training on issues related to sexual violence, as defined in this policy for individuals conducting formal investigations of reports or conducting hearings;
  • Provide all members of the International College of Holistic Studies community with a process for reporting sexual harassment or sexual violence in accordance with the policy;
  • Identify on- and off-campus resources for reporting sexual harassment or sexual violence, including law enforcement, medical, and victim support services;
  • Provide prompt and effective response to reports of sexual harassment, sexual violence, or reports of retaliation related to reports of sexual harassment or sexual violence in accordance with the policy;
  • Provide written notification of this policy; and
  • Designate trained individuals, including, or other than, the Title IX Coordinator, to serve as resources for members of the International College of Holistic Studies community who have questions or concerns regarding behavior that may be sexual harassment or sexual violence

Title IX Coordinator

The International College of Holistic Studies has a designated Title IX Coordinator: Gloria Olson / HR

The responsibilities of the Title IX Coordinator include, but may not be limited to, the duties listed below:

  • Coordinate with other responsible units to ensure that local sexual harassment and sexual violence prevention education and training programs are offered and provided as required by the policy;Disseminate the policy widely to the International College of Holistic Studies community;
  • Provide educational materials to promote compliance with the policy and familiarity with local reporting procedures;
  • Train International College of Holistic Studies employees responsible for reporting or responding to reports of sexual harassment;
  • Provide prompt and effective response to reports of sexual harassment or sexual violence in accordance with the policy;
  • Maintain records of reports of sexual harassment and sexual violence at the International College of Holistic Studies and actions
  • taken in response to reports, including records of investigations, voluntary resolutions, and disciplinary action, as appropriate; and
  • Identify and address any patterns or systemic problems that arise during the review of sexual harassment and sexual violence complaints.
  • Procedures for Reporting and Responding to Reports of Sexual Harassment or Sexual Violence

All members of the International College of Holistic Studies community are encouraged to contact the Title IX Coordinator if they observe or encounter conduct that may be subject to this policy. This includes conduct by employees, students, or third parties. Reports of sexual harassment or sexual violence may be brought to the Title IX Coordinator, or to any manager, supervisor, or other designated employee responsible for responding to reports of sexual harassment or sexual violence. If the person to whom harassment normally would be reported is the individual accused of harassment, reports may be made to another manager, supervisor, or designated employee. Managers, supervisors, and designated employees are required to notify the Title IX Coordinator or other appropriate official designated to review and investigate sexual harassment complaints when a report is received.

Reports of sexual harassment or sexual violence should be brought forward as soon as possible after the alleged conduct occurs. While there is no stated timeframe for reporting, prompt reporting will better enable the International College of Holistic Studies to respond to the report, determine the issues, and provide an appropriate remedy and/or action. All incidents should be reported even if a significant amount of time

has passed. However, delaying a report may impede the International College of Holistic Studies ability to conduct an investigation and/or to take appropriate remedial actions.

  • Required Notifications For Reports of Sexual Violence

The International College of Holistic Studies will provide a written explanation of available rights and options, including procedures to follow, when the International College of Holistic Studies receives a report that the student or employee has been a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, whether the offense occurred on- or off-campus or in connection with any International College of Holistic Studies program. The written information shall include:

to whom the alleged offense should be reported;

options for reporting to law enforcement and campus authorities, including the option to notify local or on-campus law enforcement authorities; the right to be assisted by campus authorities in notifying law enforcement authorities if the complainant so chooses and the right to decline to notify such authorities;

the rights of complainants regarding orders of protection, no contact orders, restraining orders, or similar lawful orders issued by criminal or civil courts and the International College of Holistic Studies responsibilities regarding such orders;

the importance of preserving evidence as may be necessary to prove criminal domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, or to obtain a protection order;

existing campus and community services available for victims including counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, and other services;

options for, and available assistance to, change academic, living, transportation, and working situations, if requested by the complainant and if reasonably available, regardless of whether the victim chooses to report the crime to campus police or local law enforcement;

Any applicable procedures for institutional disciplinary action.

  • Options for Resolution

Individuals reporting sexual harassment or sexual violence shall be informed about options for resolving potential violations of the policy. These options shall include procedures for Early Resolution, procedures for Formal Investigation, and filing complaints or grievances under applicable International College of Holistic Studies complaint resolution or grievance procedures. Individuals making reports also shall be informed about policies applying to confidentiality of reports under this policy. The International College of Holistic Studies shall respond to the greatest extent possible to reports of sexual harassment and sexual violence brought anonymously or brought by third parties not directly involved in the asserted offenses. However, the response to such reports may be limited if information contained in the report cannot be verified by independent facts.

Individuals reporting sexual harassment and sexual violence shall be informed about the range of possible outcomes of the report, including interim protections, remedies for the individual harmed by the incident, and disciplinary actions that might be taken against the accused as a result of the report, including information about the procedures leading to such outcomes.

An individual who is subjected to retaliation (e.g., threats, intimidation, reprisals, or adverse employment or educational actions) for having made a report of sexual harassment or sexual violence in good faith, who assisted someone with a report of sexual harassment or sexual violence, or who participated in any manner in an investigation or resolution of a report of sexual harassment or sexual violence, may make a report of retaliation under these procedures. The report of retaliation shall be subject to the procedures herein.

  • Procedures for Early Resolution

The goal of Early Resolution is to resolve concerns at the earliest stage possible with the cooperation of all parties involved. The International College of Holistic Studies utilizes Early Resolution options when the parties desire to resolve the situation cooperatively and/or when a Formal Investigation is not likely to lead to a satisfactory outcome. Participation in the Early Resolution process is voluntary. Early Resolution may include an inquiry into the facts, but typically does not include a formal investigation. Means for Early Resolution shall be flexible and encompass a full range of possible appropriate outcomes. Early Resolution includes options such as mediating an agreement between the parties, separating the parties, referring the parties to counseling programs, negotiating an agreement for disciplinary action, conducting targeted preventive educational and training programs, or providing remedies for the individual harmed by the offense. Early Resolution also includes options such as discussions with the parties, making recommendations for resolution, and conducting a follow-up review after a period of time to assure that the resolution has been implemented effectively. Early Resolution may be appropriate for responding to anonymous reports and/or third party reports. Steps taken to encourage Early Resolution and agreements reached through Early Resolution efforts should be documented.

While the International College of Holistic Studies encourages Early Resolution of a complaint, the International College of Holistic Studies does not require that parties participate in Early Resolution prior to the International College of Holistic Studies decision to initiate a Formal Investigation. Some reports of sexual harassment or sexual violence may not be appropriate for mediation but may require a Formal Investigation at the discretion of the Title IX Coordinator or other appropriate official designated to review and investigate sexual harassment complaints. The International College of Holistic Studies will not compel a complainant to engage in mediation. Mediation, even if voluntary, may not be used in cases involving sexual violence.

  • Procedures for Formal Investigation

In cases where Early Resolution is inappropriate or in cases where Early Resolution is unsuccessful, the International College of Holistic Studies may conduct a Formal Investigation. In such cases, the individual making the report may be encouraged to file a written request for Formal Investigation. The wishes of the individual making the request shall be considered, but are not determinative, in the decision to initiate a Formal Investigation of a report of sexual harassment or sexual violence. In cases where there is no written request, the Title IX Officer (Sexual Harassment Officer) or other appropriate official designated to review and investigate sexual harassment complaints, potentially in consultation with the administration, may initiate a Formal Investigation after making a preliminary inquiry into the facts.

In cases where a complainant states he or she does not want to pursue a Formal Investigation, the Title IX Coordinator should inform the complainant that the ability to investigate may be limited. When determining whether to go forward with a Formal Investigation, the Title IX Coordinator may consider:

  1. the seriousness of the allegation,
  2. in the case of a student complainant, the age of the student,
  3. whether there have been other complaints or reports against the accused, and
  4. the rights of the accused individual to receive information about the complainant and the allegations if formal proceedings with sanctions may result from the investigation. Even if a complainant does not want to pursue an investigation, under some circumstances, the Title IX Coordinator may have an obligation to investigate a complaint, such as when there is a risk to the campus community if the accused remains on campus. The complainant should be made aware of this independent obligation to investigate the complaint.
  • In order to provide a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and resolution, any Formal Investigation of reports of sexual harassment and/or sexual violence shall incorporate the following standards:
    • The individual(s) accused of conduct violating the policy shall be provided a copy of the written request for Formal Investigation or otherwise given a full and complete written statement of the allegations, and a copy of the policy; and
    • The individual(s) conducting the investigation shall be familiar with the policy, have training or experience in conducting investigations, and as relevant to the investigation, be familiar with policies and procedures specific to students, staff, faculty, and visitors. For cases involving allegations of sexual violence, the individual(s) conducting the investigation must receive annual training on issues related to sexual violence. Such training includes how to conduct an investigation that protects the safety of the complainants and promotes accountability.
  • If the alleged conduct is also the subject of a criminal investigation, the campus may not wait for the conclusion of the criminal investigation to begin an investigation pursuant to this policy. However, a campus may need to coordinate its fact-finding efforts with the police investigation. Once notified that the police department has completed its gathering of evidence (not the ultimate outcome of the investigation or the filing of any criminal charges), the campus must promptly resume and complete its fact-finding for the sexual harassment or sexual violence investigation.
  • The investigation generally shall include interviews with the parties if available, interviews with other witnesses as needed, and a review of relevant documents as appropriate. Disclosure of facts to parties and witnesses shall be limited to what is reasonably necessary to conduct a fair and thorough investigation. Participants in an investigation shall be advised that maintaining confidentiality is essential to protect the integrity of the investigation.
  • The investigator shall apply a preponderance of evidence standard to determine whether there has been a violation of this policy.
  • Upon request, the complainant and the accused may each have a representative present when he or she is interviewed, and at any subsequent proceeding or related meeting. Other witnesses may have a representative present at the discretion of the investigator or as required by applicable International College of Holistic Studies policy or collective bargaining agreement.
  • At any time during the investigation, the investigator may recommend that interim protections or remedies for the parties or witnesses be provided by appropriate International College of Holistic Studies officials. These protections or remedies may include separating the parties, placing limitations on contact between the parties, or making alternative working or student housing arrangements. Failure to comply with the terms of interim protections may be considered a separate violation of this policy.
  • The investigation shall be completed as promptly as possible and in most cases within 60 working days of the date the request for formal investigation was filed. This deadline may be extended on approval by a designated International College of Holistic Studies official.
  • Generally, an investigation results in a written report that at a minimum includes a statement of the allegations and issues, the positions of the parties, a summary of the evidence, findings of fact, and a determination by the investigator whether this policy has been violated. The report also may contain a recommendation for actions to resolve the complaint, including preventive educational programs, remedies for the complainant, and a referral to disciplinary procedures as appropriate. The report is submitted to a designated International College of Holistic Studies official with authority to implement the actions necessary to resolve the complaint. The report may be used as evidence in other related procedures, such as subsequent complaints, grievances and/or disciplinary actions.
  • The complainant shall be informed if there were findings made that the policy was or was not violated and of actions taken to resolve the complaint, if any, that are directly related to the complainant, such as an order that the accused not contact the complainant. In accordance with International College of Holistic Studies policies protecting individuals’ privacy, the complainant may generally be notified that the matter has been referred for disciplinary action, but shall not be informed of the details of the recommended disciplinary action without the consent of the accused, consistent with this policy.
  • The complainant and the accused may request a copy of the investigative report pursuant to International College of Holistic Studies policy governing privacy and access to personal information. However, in accordance with International College of Holistic Studies policy, the report shall be redacted to protect the privacy of personal and confidential information regarding all individuals other than the individual requesting the report.
  • At the conclusion of any disciplinary proceeding arising from an allegation of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking, the complainant and the accused will be simultaneously informed in writing of:
    • The outcome of any International College of Holistic Studies disciplinary proceeding;
    • The International College of Holistic Studies procedures for appealing the results of the proceeding;
    • Any change to the results that occur prior to the time that such results become final; and
    • When results become final.
    • Complaints or Grievances Involving Allegations of Sexual Harassment or Sexual Violence

An individual who believes he or she has been subjected to sexual harassment or sexual violence may file a complaint or grievance pursuant to the applicable complaint resolution or grievance procedure listed in Appendix I: International College of Holistic Studies Complaint Resolution and Grievance Procedures. Such complaint or grievance may be filed either instead of or in addition to making a report of sexual harassment to the Title IX Coordinator or other appropriate official designated to review and investigate sexual harassment and sexual violence complaints under this policy. A complaint or grievance alleging sexual harassment or sexual violence must meet all the requirements under the applicable complaint resolution or grievance procedure, including time limits for filing.

If a complaint or grievance alleging sexual harassment or sexual violence is filed in addition to a report made to the Title IX Coordinator or other appropriate official designated to review and investigate sexual harassment complaints under this policy, the complaint or grievance shall be held in abeyance subject to the requirements of any applicable complaint resolution or grievance procedure, pending the outcome of the Early Resolution or Formal Investigation procedures. If the individual wishes to proceed with the complaint or grievance, the Early Resolution or Formal Investigation shall constitute the first step or steps of the applicable complaint resolution or grievance procedure.

An individual who has made a report of sexual harassment or sexual violence also may file a complaint or grievance alleging that the actions taken in response to the report of sexual harassment or sexual violence did not follow policy. Such a complaint or grievance may not be filed to address a disciplinary sanction imposed upon the accused. Any complaint or grievance regarding the resolution of a report of sexual harassment or sexual violence must be filed in a timely manner. The time period for filing begins on the date the individual was notified of the outcome of the sexual harassment or sexual violence investigation or other resolution process pursuant to this policy, and/or of the actions taken by the administration in response to the report of sexual harassment or sexual violence, whichever is later.

  • Remedies and Referral to Disciplinary Procedures

Findings of policy violations may be considered to determine remedies for individuals harmed by the sexual harassment or sexual violence and shall be referred to applicable disciplinary procedures. Procedures under this policy shall be coordinated with applicable local complaint resolution, grievance, and disciplinary procedures to avoid duplication in the fact-finding process whenever possible. Violations of the policy may include engaging in sexual harassment or sexual violence, retaliating against a complainant reporting sexual harassment or sexual violence, or violating interim protections. Investigative reports made pursuant to this policy may be used as evidence in subsequent complaint resolution, grievance, and disciplinary proceedings as permitted by the applicable procedures.

  • Privacy

The International College of Holistic Studies shall protect the privacy of individuals involved in a report of sexual harassment or sexual violence to the extent permitted by law and International College of Holistic Studies policy. A report of sexual harassment or sexual violence may result in the gathering of extremely sensitive information about individuals in the International College of Holistic Studies community. While such information is considered confidential, International College of Holistic Studies policy regarding access to public records and disclosure of personal information may require disclosure of certain information concerning a report of sexual harassment or sexual violence. In such cases, every effort shall be made to redact the records in order to protect the privacy of individuals. An individual who has made a report of sexual harassment or sexual violence may be advised of sanctions imposed against the accused when the individual needs to be aware of the sanction in order for it to be fully effective (such as restrictions on communication or contact with the individual who made the report). In addition, when the offense involves a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act permits disclosure to the complainant the final results of a disciplinary proceeding against the alleged accused, regardless of whether the International College of Holistic Studies concluded that a violation was committed. Information regarding disciplinary action taken against the accused shall not be disclosed without the accused consent, unless permitted by law as noted above, or unless it is necessary to ensure compliance with the action or the safety of individuals.

  • Confidentiality of Reports of Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence

The International College of Holistic Studies does not employ professional or pastoral counselors. The International College of Holistic Studies notifies the International College of Holistic Studies community that the Title IX Coordinator, managers, supervisors, and other designated employees have an obligation to respond to reports of sexual harassment or sexual violence, even if the individual making the report requests that no action be taken. An individual’s requests regarding the confidentiality of reports of sexual harassment or sexual violence will be considered in determining an appropriate response; however, such requests will be considered in the dual contexts of the International College of Holistic Studies legal obligation to ensure a working and learning environment free from sexual harassment and sexual violence and the due process rights of the accused to be informed of the allegations and their source. Some level of disclosure may be necessary to ensure a complete and fair investigation, although the International College of Holistic Studies will comply with requests for confidentiality to the extent possible.

  • Retention of Records Regarding Reports of Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence

The office of the Title IX Coordinator is responsible for maintaining records relating to sexual harassment and sexual violence reports, investigations, and resolutions. Records shall be maintained in accordance with the International College of Holistic Studies records policies. All records pertaining to pending litigation or a request for records shall be maintained in accordance with instructions from legal counsel.

FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (FERPA)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all International College of Holistic Studies academies that receive funds under an applicable course of the U.S. Department of Education.

FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18, attends the International College of Holistic Studies or beyond the International College of Holistic Studies level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are “eligible students.” At the age of 18 and beyond, parental/guardian access to dependent student’s records are confined to financial records and do not include academic or personal.

  • Parents or eligible students have the right to inspect and review the student’s education records maintained by International College of Holistic Studies. Academies are not required to provide copies of records unless, for reasons such as great distance, it is impossible for parents or eligible students to review the records. Academies may charge a fee for copies.
  • Parents or eligible students have the right to request that the International College of Holistic Studies correct records which they believe to be inaccurate or misleading. If International College of Holistic Studies decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student then has the right to a formal hearing. After the hearing, if International College of Holistic Studies still decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student has the right to place a statement with the record setting forth his or her view about the contested information.
  • Generally, academies must have written permission from the parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student’s education record. However, FERPA allows academies to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31):
    • International College of Holistic Studies officials with legitimate educational interest;
    • Other International College of Holistic Studies to which a student is transferring;
    • Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes;
    • Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student;
    • Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of International College of Holistic Studies;
    • Accrediting organizations;
    • To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena;
    • Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and
    • State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law.

Although International College of Holistic Studies does not maintain or offer a “directory” International College of Holistic Studies may disclose, without consent, “directory” information such as a student’s name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance. However, academies must tell parents and eligible students about directory information and allow parents and eligible students a reasonable amount of time to request that International College of Holistic Studies not disclose directory information about them. Academies must notify parents and eligible students annually of their rights under FERPA. The actual means of notification (special letter, inclusion in a PTA bulletin, student handbook, or newspaper article) is left to the discretion of International College of Holistic Studies.

Or you may contact us at the following address: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SWCCAS

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND SUPPORT

A comprehensive listing of San Diego housing resources can be found here:

http://www.sandiegocounty.gov/content/dam/sdc/sdhcd/docs/rental-assistance/housing_resource.pdf

Please contact (619) 231-9400 for general program assistance and (619) 578-7305 for rental assistance.

  • Homeless Shelters:
    • Eight separate resources are listed on pages 31-32 of the above document including:
      • San Diego Rescue Mission’s Nueva Vida Haven at 120 Elm St. (619) 687-3720
      • YWCA’s Cortez Hill Family Center’s for low-income, single parent and dual-parent families with children / administrative offices at 1012 C St. / (619) 239-0355
  • Permanent Supportive Housing:
    • Twelve separate resources are listed on pages 36-38 of the above document including:
      • St. Vincent de Paul Village – San Diego Housing Commission’s Village Place – Shelter Plus Care Project at 32 17th St., Ste 111 / (619) 687-1074
  • Halfway and Transitional Housing:
    • More than 60 separate resources are listed on pages 44-47 of the above document including:
      • San Diego Rescue Missions’ 120 Elm St. location / (619) 687-3720
      • Includes a Men’s Center, a Women and Children’s Center and the 2nd Ave. Transitional Housing unit.
      • Salvation Army Transitional Living Center’s 2799 Health Center Drive location / (858) 279-1100
      • Program for women and children experiencing homelessness
  • Day Shelters:
  • Affordable Housing for Lower Income Households:
    • More than 150 separate San Diego complexes are listed at the above link on pages 13-21. In addition, more than 45 Single Room Occupancy (SRO) Hotels are listed on pages 25-27 of the above document.
  • Residential Alcohol and Drug Treatment Centers:

San Diego is dedicated to serving the homeless and low-income. We have listed the shelters and low cost housing services in San Diego. This list has homeless shelters, halfway houses, affordable housing, etc. The database consists of emergency shelters, homeless shelters, day shelters, transitional housing, shared housing, residential drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs and permanent affordable housing.

Domestic Violence Programs

The YWCA of San Diego County provides resources for battered women and children, and one of the only such shelter in the state of to offer around the clock security. Resident advocates are also present 24 hours a day to provide practical and emotional support to victims of domestic violence. More information about the YWCA’s resources can be found here:

http://www.ywcasandiego.org/get-help/beckys-house.html

U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD)
(800)669-9777 www.hud.giv
State of California Department of Fair Employment & Housing
(800) 884-1684 www.dfeh.ca.gov
San Diego Housing Commission
(619) 231-9400 www.sdhc.org
San Diego Public Housing
The San Diego Housing Commission (SDHC) is an active and innovative developer of new Affordable housing. It owns 2,221 affordable housing units and is rapidly moving forward on buying additional multifamily properties. For more information about these resources, please find online information here: http://www.sdhc.org/Affordable-Housing/

Types of Shelters and Service Information

(One can also contact 211 for further information and resources)

Day Shelters supplement homeless and low-income people when the shelter their staying in only offers shelter on an overnight basis. Case management is often provided and sometimes there are laundry and shower facilities. Meals and basic hygiene may also be offered. Almost all day shelters provide their services free of charge. Any emergency or homeless shelter that allows clients to stay during the day is also classified under this category.

Emergency Homeless Shelters both provide short term relief for the homeless & low-income. Usually there is a maximum stay of 3 months or less. Many of these shelters ask their clients to leave during the day. Meals and other supportive services are often offered. 3 times out of 5 these shelters offer their services free of charge.

Halfway Housing helps transition individuals and families from shelters or homelessness to permanent housing. Length of stay is usually anywhere from 6 months to 2 years. Residents are often required to pay at least 30% of their income toward program fees. Sometimes the money they pay in fees is returned to them when they leave. Any emergency or homeless shelter that allows their clients to stay more than 6 months is also classified under this category.

Permanent Affordable Housing is a long-term solution for housing. Residents are often allowed to stay as long as they remain in the low-income bracket but is sometimes limited 3 – 5 years. Residents pay no more than 30% of their income towards rent. Emergency shelters, homeless shelters and transitional housing programs that allow their clients to stay without a maximum stay are also classified under this category.

Drug and Alcohol Rehab programs are intended to treat alcohol and/or drug dependency. The cost of participating in one of these programs and the method of treatment range significantly.

Supportive Housing Programs that provide an alternative living arrangement for individuals who, because of age, disability, substance abuse, mental illness, chronic homelessness or other circumstances, are unable to live independently without care, supervision and/or support to help them in the activities of daily living; or who need access to case management, housing support, vocational, employment and other services to transition to independent living.

Shared Housing Programs helps bring low income persons together and helps prevent homelessness by providing affordable housing options. This service is good for families, disabled persons, and others wanted more companionship. Shelterlistings.org finds these shared housing locations and lists them throughout our website.

Rooming House or Boarding House A rooming house is a building in which renters occupy single rooms and share kitchens, bathrooms, and common areas. The location may be a converted single family home, a converted hotel, or a purpose built structure. Rooming houses are low cost housing and may have as few as three rooms for rent, or more than a hundred. The same goes for boarding houses. We list these types of residences throughout shelterlistings.org.

Transitional housing is affordable low cost supportive housing designed to provide housing and appropriate support services to persons who are homeless or who are close to homelessness. The transition is to help them be more self-sufficient to move towards independent living on their own. Services provided at transitional housing facilities varies, from substance abuse treatment, to psychological assistance, job training, domestic violence assistance, etc. The assistance provided varies, but it is generally affordable and low cost housing. Read the descriptions of each of the transitional living locations for more detailed information.

SAFETY PROCEDURES

  • First Aid: A first aid kit is located in the International College of Holistic Studies main office and in the Dean of Student Services / Academic Coordinators’ and the faculty lounge.
  • Fainting: Do not move the person; call 911. Give facts as much as possible. Keep calm and notify other CST Members for help, if necessary. Make the person comfortable.
  • Cut finger: Educator should immediately check the wound to see how deep the cut is. Small cuts should be washed, dried, and then covered with a bandage. Bandages and first aid kits are kept in the dispensary and the educators’ office.
  • Cuts requiring stitches: If possible, a faculty member should take the student to the doctor.

Dangerous Situations, Alerting Faculty, Students, Guests and/or Neighbors

Are brought to the attention of Campus Security Support Team (CST) and if confirmed, will alert and students by announcing, emailing, text and /or a written notification that will be posted in a conspicuous area, directing them to either a safe location and or the City County Health Department. Once the dangerous situation is diminished, an announcement, email, text and/ or a written notification will be posted or sent to students when classes will resume.

Extreme Weather Conditions Procedures

Are issued from the Local Weather Service, International College of Holistic Studies offices are closed and classes are cancelled. Once the weather conditions are diminished, the CST will alert the faculty and students when classes will resume.

During

International College of Holistic Studies will notify the traveling student if a winter storm and extreme cold is expected. If the student is traveling long distances, the student will be advised to leave early or not to travel at all. If the winter storm and extreme cold happens while faculty, students and guests are in attendance, the following will apply:

  • Stay indoors during the storm.
  • Walk carefully on snowy, icy, walkways.
  • Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive.

After

  • If International College of Holistic Studies loses power or heat for more than a few hours or if you do not have adequate supplies to stay warm in the International College of Holistic Studies, you may want to go to a designated public shelter if you can get there safely. Text SHELTER + your ZIP code to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the nearest shelter in your area (e.g., SHELTER20472)
  • Take precautions when traveling to the shelter. Dress warmly in layers, wear boots, mittens, and a hat.
  • Continue to protect yourself from frostbite and hypothermia by wearing warm, loose-fitting, lightweight clothing in several layers. Stay indoors, if possible.

Thunderstorms & Lightning 

Procedures

Before:

To prepare for a thunderstorm, you should do the following:

  • Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage.
  • Get inside the International College of Holistic Studies, or an automobile (not a convertible). Although you may be injured if lightning strikes your car, you are much safer inside a vehicle than outside.
  • Remember that Rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide NO protection from lightning.
  • Close window blinds, shades or curtains.
  • Unplug any electronic equipment well before the storm arrives.

During:

If thunderstorm and lightning are occurring in your area, you should:

  • Avoid contact with corded phones and devices including those plugged into electric for recharging. Cordless and wireless phones not connected to wall outlets are OK to use.
  • Avoid contact with electrical equipment or cords.
  • Unplug appliances and other electrical items such as computers and turn off air conditioners. Power surges from lightning can cause serious damage.
    Avoid contact with plumbing.
  • Do not wash your hands and do not do laundry. Plumbing and bathroom fixtures can conduct electricity. Stay away from windows and doors.
  • Do not lie on concrete floors and do not lean against concrete walls. Take shelter in a sturdy building.
  • Avoid isolated sheds or other small structures in open areas.
  • Avoid contact with anything metal—motorcycles and bicycles.

If lightning strikes you or someone you know, call 9-1-1 for medical assistance as soon as possible. The following are things you should check when you attempt to give aid to a victim of lightning:

  • Breathing – if breathing has stopped, begin mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Heartbeat – if the heart has stopped, administer CPR.
  • Pulse – if the victim has a pulse and is breathing, look for other possible injuries.
  • Check for burns where the lightning entered and left the body.
  • Also be alert for nervous system damage, broken bones and loss of hearing and eyesight.

After:

  • Never drive through a flooded roadway. Turn around, don’t drown!
  • Stay away from downed power lines and report them immediately.

Plan for a Pandemic:

  • Get involved in your community as it works to prepare for an influenza pandemic.
  • Limit the Spread of Germs and Prevent Infection
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.
  • If possible, stay home.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing.
  • Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

Utility Shut Off Natural gas

Natural gas leaks and explosions are responsible for a significant number of fires following disasters. It is vital that all faculty know how to shut off natural gas. Because there are different gas shut-off procedures for different gas meter configurations, it is important to contact your local gas company for any guidance on preparations and response regarding gas service to International College of Holistic Studies.

  • If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, get everyone out quickly.
  • Turn off the gas if you can and call the gas company.
  • Caution: If you turn off the gas for any reason, a qualified professional must turn it back on. NEVER attempt to turn the gas back on yourself.

Water

Water quickly becomes a precious resource following many disasters. It is vital that all faculty learn how to shut off the water.

Locate the shut-off valve for the water line that enters International College of Holistic Studies and label this valve with a tag for easy identification. The effects of gravity may drain the water in your hot water heater and toilet tanks unless you trap it by shutting off the main house valve. (This is not the street valve in the cement box at the curb – the street valve is extremely difficult to turn and requires a special tool.)

Electricity

Electrical sparks have the potential of igniting natural gas if it is leaking. It is wise to teach all responsible faculty where and how to shut off the electricity.

Locate your electrical circuit box. For your safety, always shut off all the individual circuits before shutting off the main circuit.

Fire Procedure

If you smell smoke or see fire, report it immediately to a facilitator. Proceed as follows:

  • Students exit in single file out the closest doors. If you have a guest at the time, the guest is your responsibility.
  • After exiting International College of Holistic Studies, proceed safely away from the International College of Holistic Studies and locate at the corner of West Beech and State Street (outside of 7-11)
  • Support staff in the main lobby/office will help guest(s) in reception area out the front doors. Proceed to safety away from the International College of Holistic Studies.
  • Familiarize yourself with your evacuation route and the location of all emergency and regular exits.
  • The evacuation route illustration is found next to all fire extinguishers.

VIOLATION OF FIRE SAFETY RULES PUTS LIVES IN JEOPARDY. TAMPERING WITH FIRE ALARMS OR FIRE EQUIPMENT CAN RESULT IN FINES AND POSSIBLE INCARCERATION ACCORDING TO STATE LAWS

Flood

Before:

Even if you feel you live in a community with a low risk of flooding, remember that anywhere it rains, it can flood. Just because you haven’t experienced a flood in the past, doesn’t mean you won’t in the future. Flood risk isn’t just based on history; it’s also based on a number of factors including rainfall, topography, flood-control measures, river-flow and tidal-surge data, and changes due to new construction and development.

To prepare for a flood, you should:
“Check valves” are installed in the sinks to prevent water from backing up into the drains.

During:

If a flood is likely in your area, you should:
Be aware that flash flooding can occur. If there is any possibility of a flash flood, move immediately to higher ground. Do not wait for instructions to evacuate.

If you must prepare to evacuate, you should do the following:

  • Turn off utilities at the main switches or valves if instructed to do so.
  • Disconnect electrical appliances. Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water. If you have to leave International College of Holistic Studies, remember these evacuation tips:
  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall. If you have to walk in water, walk where the water is not moving.
  • Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground, when water is not moving or not more than a few inches deep. You and the vehicle can be swept away quickly.
  • If your vehicle is trapped in rapidly moving water, stay in the vehicle. If the water is rising inside the vehicle, seek refuge on the roof.
  • Do not camp or park your vehicle along streams, rivers or creeks, particularly during threatening conditions.

After

  • Although floodwaters may be down in some areas, many dangers still exist. Here are some things to remember in the days ahead:
  • Use local alerts and warning systems to get information and expert informed advice as soon as available. Avoid moving water.
  • Stay away from damaged areas unless your assistance has been specifically requested by police, fire, or relief organization.
  • Emergency workers will be assisting people in flooded areas. You can help them by staying off the roads and out of the way.
  • Play it safe. Additional flooding or flash floods can occur. Listen for local warnings and information. If your car stalls in rapidly rising waters, get out immediately and climb to higher ground.
  • Return home only when authorities indicate it is safe.
  • Roads may still be closed because they have been damaged or are covered by water. Barricades have been placed for your protection. If you come upon a barricade or a flooded road, go another way.
  • If you must walk or drive in areas that have been flooded.
  • Stay on firm ground. Moving water only 6 inches deep can sweep you off your feet. Standing water may be electrically charged from underground or downed power lines.
  • Flooding may have caused familiar places to change. Floodwaters often erode roads and walkways. Flood debris may hide animals and broken bottles, and it’s also slippery. Avoid walking or driving through it.
  • Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Roads may have weakened and could collapse under the weight of a car.

Stay out of any building if it is surrounded by floodwaters.

Use extreme caution when entering buildings; there may be hidden damage, particularly in foundations.

Earthquake 

Before

  • Every attempt to secure shelves, heavy objects, mirrors, and electronic such as computers and printers.

During

  • Drop, cover and hold on. Minimize your movements to a few steps to a nearby safe place and if you are indoors, stay there until the shaking has stopped and you are sure exiting is safe
  • If indoors
  • Drop to your hands and knees.
  • Cover your head and neck with your arms. This position protects you from falling and provides some protection for vital organs. Because moving can put you in danger from the debris in your path, only move if you need to get away from the danger of falling objects. If you can move safely, crawl for additional cover under a sturdy desk or table. If there is low furniture, or an interior wall or corner nearby and the path is clear, these may also provide some additional cover. Stay away from glass, windows, outside doors and walls, and anything that could fall, such as lighting fixtures or furniture.
    HOLD ON to any sturdy shelter until the shaking stops.
  • Stay away from glass, windows, outside doors and walls, and anything that could fall, such as lighting fixtures or furniture.
  • DO NOT get in a doorway as this does not provide protection from falling or flying objects and you likely will not be able to remain standing.
  • Stay inside until the shaking stops and it is safe to go outside. Do not exit the International College of Holistic Studies during the shaking. Research has shown that most injuries occur when people inside buildings attempt to move to a different location inside the International College of Holistic Studies or try to leave.
  • Be aware that the electricity may go out or the sprinkler systems or fire alarms may turn on.

After

  • Do not light a match.
  • Do not move about or kick up dust.
  • Cover your mouth with a handkerchief or clothing. Tap on a pipe or wall so rescuers can locate you.
  • Use a whistle if one is available. Shout only as a last resort. Shouting can cause you to inhale dangerous amounts of dust.

When the Shaking Stops:

  • When the shaking stops, look around to make sure it is safe to move and there is a safe way out through the debris. Then exit the school.
  • Expect aftershocks. These secondary shockwaves are usually less violent than the main quake but can be strong enough to do additional damage to weakened structures and can occur in the first hours, days, weeks, or even months after the quake. Drop, Cover, and Hold On whenever you feel shaking.
  • Check for injuries and provide assistance if you have training. Assist with rescues if you can do this safely. Look for and extinguish small fires. Fire is the most common hazard after an earthquake. Never use a lighter or matches near damaged areas.
  • Use the telephone only for emergency calls.
  • Go to a designated public shelter if your home had been damaged and is no longer safe. Text SHELTER + your ZIP code to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the nearest shelter in your area (example: shelter 12345).
  • Stay away from damaged areas. Stay away unless your assistance has been specifically requested by police, fire, or relief organizations. Return home only when authorities say it is safe

Be careful when driving after an earthquake and anticipate traffic light outages.

After it is determined that its’ safe to return, your safety should be your primary priority as you begin clean up and recovery.

Leave the area if you smell gas or fumes from other chemicals. Inspect utilities. (Follow the Utility Shut off).

Bomb Threats

Most bomb threat are received by phone. Bomb threats are serious until proven otherwise. Faculty and students are to act quickly but remain calm and obtain as much information as possible and write it down. If a bomb threat is received by phone:

  • Remain calm.
  • Keep the caller on the line for as long as possible. DO NOT HANG UP, even if the caller does. Listen carefully. Be polite and show interest.
  • Try to keep the caller talking to learn more information.
  • If possible, write a note to a faculty member or student to call the authorities or, as soon as the caller hangs up, immediately notify them yourself.
  • If your phone has a display, copy the number and/or letters on the window display. Write down as much detail as you can remember. Try to get exact words.
  • Immediately upon termination of the call, do not hang up, but from a different phone, contact FPS (Federal Protective Services) immediately with information and await instructions.

If A Bomb Threat Is Received By Handwritten Note

  • Call 9-1-1
  • Handle note as minimally as possible

If A Bomb Threat Is Received By Email

  • Call 911
  • Do not delete the message.

Signs of a Suspicious Package

  • No return address
  • Poorly handwritten
  • Excessive postage
  • Misspelled words
  • Stains
  • Incorrect titles
  • Strange odor
  • Foreign postage
  • Strange sounds
  • Restrictive notes
  • Unexpected delivery

Do Not

  • Use cell phones; radio signals have the potential to detonate a bomb.
  • Evacuate the school until police arrive and evaluate the threat.
  • Activate the fire alarm.
  • Touch or move a suspicious package

Bomb Threat Call Procedures and Checklist Who to Contact (select one)

  • Follow your local guidelines
  • Federal Protective Service (FPS) Police 1-877-4-FPS-411 (1-877-437-7411)
  • 911

Ask Caller
When asking the caller the following, take notes on anything, you might forget and include questions:

  • Where is the bomb located? (Building/Floor/Room, etc.)
  • When will it go off?
  • What does it look like?
  • What kind of bomb is it?
  • What will make it explode?
  • Did you place the bomb? Yes/ No
  • Why?
  • What is your name?

Exact Words of Threat | Information about Caller

  • Where is the caller located? (Background and level of noise)
  • Estimated age:
  • Is voice familiar? If so, who does it sound like?
  • Other points: Take any notes that may aid in the investigation.

Explosion  

Before

The following are things you can do to protect yourself, in the event of an explosion.

  • Knowing your community’s warning systems and disaster plans, including evacuation routes.

During

  • Get under a sturdy table.
  • Exit the school as quickly as possible. Stay low if there is smoke. Do not stop to retrieve personal possessions or make phone calls.
  • Check for fire and other hazards.
  • Once you are out, attempt to meet at designated areas.
  • Move away from sidewalks or streets to be used by emergency officials or others still exiting the International College of Holistic Studies. Tap on a pipe or wall so rescuers can hear where you are.
  • If possible, use a whistle to signal rescuers.
  • Shout only as a last resort. Shouting can cause a person to inhale dangerous amounts of dust.
  • Avoid unnecessary movement so you don’t kick up dust.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with anything you have on hand.

After

As we learned from the events of September 11, 2001, the following things can happen after a terrorist attack:

  • There can be significant numbers of casualties and/or damage to buildings and the infrastructure. So employers need up-to-date information about any medical needs you may have and on how to contact your designated beneficiaries.
  • Heavy law enforcement involvement at local, state and federal levels follows a terrorist attack due to the event’s criminal nature.
  • Health and mental health resources in the affected communities can be strained to their limits, maybe even overwhelmed.
  • Extensive media coverage, strong public fear and international implications and consequences can continue for a prolonged period.

The school may be closed.

The school may have to evacuate, avoiding blocked roads for your safety. Clean-up may take many months.

TERRORIST ATTACKS

International College of Holistic Studies does not want to dismiss or diminish the possibility to terrorism; however, we believe the risk is low in relationship to Threat/Hazards based on:

  • Small faculty, less than 15
  • Small student body, less than 100
  • Building has no significant interest
  • Building does not store or contains hazardous chemicals No luggage is stored or kept on premise

TIMELY WARNING

In the event that a situation arises, either on or off campus, that, in the judgment of the Campus Security Support Team (CST), constitutes an ongoing or continuing threat, a campus wide “timely warning” will be issued. The warning will be issued through the school by either, verbal communications, intercom broadcast system, cell phones, emails and text, social media and signage to faculty, students and guests. Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should report the circumstances to the CST, by phone or in person.

ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT

International College of Holistic Studies published and distributes an annual security report by Oct. 1 to all enrolled students and all faculty.

POLICIES

Policy: Preparation of Disclosure of Crime Statistics

The Executive Director, Compliance and other staff prepare this report to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act) as amended by the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013. The full text of this report can be located on our web site at www.icohs.edu. This report is prepared in cooperation with the local law enforcement agencies surrounding our main campus. Local law enforcement provides updated information on their educational efforts and programs to comply with the Act.

Campus crime, arrest and referral statistics include those reported to the Police Department and Campus Security Support Team. These statistics may also include crimes that have occurred in private residences or businesses and is not required by law. International College of Holistic Studies accepts information on a voluntary or confidential basis, should they feel it is in the best interest of the client. A procedure is in place to anonymously capture crime statistics disclosed confidentially during such a session.

Each year, an e-mail notification is made to all enrolled students that provide the web site to access this report. Faculty receives similar notification at our faculty meetings and Professional Development. All prospective faculty, potential students may obtain copies of the report at the International College of Holistic Studies or by calling 858-581-9460.

Policy: How to Report Criminal Offenses

To report a crime on or off campus:
Contact Police Department at (non-emergencies),
Dial 9-1-1- (emergencies only). Additionally, you may report a crime to the following areas:

table pending

Policy: Voluntary Confidential Reporting

If you are the victim of a crime and do not want to pursue action within International College of Holistic Studies or the criminal justice system, you may still want to consider making a confidential report. With your permission, the CST can file a report on the details of the incident without revealing your identity. The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wish to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety of yourself and others. With such information, International College of Holistic Studies can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving students; determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential danger. Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crimes statistics for the institution. International College of Holistic Studies prohibits any retaliation against anyone who in good faith reports any violations of the campus security policy.

Policy: Limited Voluntary Confidential Reporting

The Police Department encourages anyone who is the victim or witness to any crime to promptly report the incident to the police. Because police reports are public records under state law, the Police Department cannot hold reports of crime in confidence. Confidential reports for purposes of inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics can generally be made to CST campus security authorities as identified above.

Statement: Institution That Has a Memorandum of Understanding, (MOU)

International College of Holistic Studies recognizes that laws and rules are necessary for society to function and supports the enforcement of law by governmental agencies and rules by officials of the International College of Holistic Studies. All persons on the campus are subject to these laws and rules at all times. While International College of Holistic Studies is private property, and Constitutional protections apply, law enforcement officers may enter the campus to conduct business as needed. Additionally, the officers are invited to patrol the campus to assist CST in deterring crime. All law enforcement agencies are asked to Check in at the front desk and/or with the School Director prior to entering International College of Holistic Studies. CST is recognized by the Police Department. CST enjoys an especially good relationship with the Police. The response time of the police department to campus averages less than two minutes for emergency calls. The exercise of that authority is described in a “memorandum of understanding” (MOU) between Police and CST that outlines which law enforcement agency will have jurisdiction over which types of offenses.

As noted in the introduction and the emergency policies, the San Diego Police Department is notified of all serious crime on campus and is immediately notified of major crimes via the telephone. International College of Holistic Studies relies on the telephone to contact the county emergency dispatch center for fire and emergency medical needs. All victims are offered an opportunity to report crimes to CITY Police. Annually, International College of Holistic Studies receives an email report of all crimes committed on the campus from the Police Department.

Policy: Encouragement of Accurate and Prompt Crime Reporting

Faculty, students, and guests are encouraged to report all crimes and public safety related incidents to International College of Holistic Studies in a timely manner. To report a crime or emergency call the:

CST Team Leader: Kieu Vo, Executive Director of the International College of Holistic Studies: 858—581-9460 x306 / kieu.v@icohs.edu

CST will investigate a report when it is deemed appropriate.

If assistance is required from the Police Department or the Fire Department, CST will contact the appropriate unit. If a sexual assault or rape should occur, faculty on the scene, including CST, will offer the victim a wide variety of services.

Policy: Counselors and Confidential Crime Reporting

International College of Holistic Studies does not employ professional or pastoral counselors. All reports of crime will be investigated. Violations of the law will be referred to law enforcement agencies and when appropriate, to International College of Holistic Studies CST leader for review.

Policy: Security Awareness Programs for Faculty and students

Prior to course start, orientation is held. Students are informed that International College of Holistic Studies does not have campus police. Students are informed about the campus security policies and procedures contained in this report and about crime awareness on the International College of Holistic Studies and in surrounding neighbor-hoods. Similar information is presented to new CST Members. A common theme of all awareness and crime prevention programs is to encourage faculty and students to be aware of their responsibility for their own security and the security of others. An outline of the ICoHS “Security Awareness Programs” is available under separate cover and available upon request.

Policy: Security of and Access to Campus Facilities

The International College of Holistic Studies has three entrances/exits equipped with locks. They are located on the north side, south side, and east side of the building. The front (east side) entrance is monitored by the front desk staff when the International College of Holistic Studies is open for business from 8am to 9pm Monday through Friday and Saturdays during clinic from 12:00pm to 4:00pm. The north side and west side entrance/exits remain locked from 6:00pm to 8:00am. These doors are unable to be opened from the outside but can be opened at any time from the inside. All management level have keys (building fobs and physical keys) to all outside doors. Students only have access to enter the building by the east side door and are monitored by the front desk staff.

Policy: Crime Prevention Programs for Faculty and Students

Crime Prevention Programs on personal safety and theft prevention are discussed at orientation.
To enhance personal safety, and especially after dark, walk with friends or colleagues from International College of Holistic Studies to your destination.

Policy: Addressing Alcoholic Beverages

The possession, sale or the furnishing of alcohol on the International College of Holistic Studies campus is prohibited. The International College of Holistic Studies has been designated “Drug free” and under no circumstances is the consumption of alcohol permitted. The possession, sale, manufacture or distribution of any controlled substance is illegal under both state and federal laws. Such laws are strictly enforced by the Police Department. Violators are subject to disciplinary action, criminal prosecution, fine and imprisonment. It is unlawful to sell, furnish or provide alcohol to a person under the age of 21. The possession of alcohol by anyone under 21 years of age in a public place or a place open to the public is illegal. It is also a violation of the International College of Holistic Studies Alcohol Policy for anyone to consume or possess alcohol in any public or private area of the International College of Holistic Studies. Organizations or groups violating alcohol/substance policies or laws may be subject to sanctions by the Police.

Policy: Illegal Drug Possession

International College of Holistic Studies has been designated “Drug free” and under no circumstances is the possession, use, or sale of illegal drugs permitted. The possession, sale, manufacture or distribution of any controlled substance is illegal under both state and federal laws. Such laws are strictly enforced by the Police Department. Violators are subject to disciplinary action, criminal prosecution, fine and imprisonment. The possession, use or sale of illegal drugs on the campus is a violation of the International College of Holistic Studies Illegal Drug Possession.

Policy: Medical Marijuana

Although the permits the use, possession, and cultivation of medical marijuana by individuals possessing lawfully issued medical marijuana cards, federal law prohibits use, possession, or cultivation in educational institutions and other recipients of federal funds. Therefore, the use, possession, and/or cultivation is prohibited at International College of Holistic Studies, including on campus, on International College of Holistic Studies property, or at events sponsored by The International College of Holistic Studies. Even if a student, faculty, or staff member possesses the appropriate documentation permitting the use, possession, and/or cultivation of medical marijuana, these activities are prohibited and are subject to disciplinary action.
The intent of this notice is to protect the health and safety of our faculty, staff, guests, and students.

Policy: Substance Abuse Education

International College of Holistic Studies has developed a contact list to prevent the illicit use of drugs and the abuse of alcohol by faculty and students. The list provides services related to drug use and abuse including dissemination of informational materials, educational programs and counseling services.

Policy: Campus Safety

All reported incidents are reviewed and applicable information is collected and presented to the proper authority. In order to ensure that our campus remains safe, it is important for members of the campus to report this information in a timely manner. Any suspicious activity should be considered a reasonable suspicion and reported. (Examples of suspicious activities include seeing an unescorted guest in an unapproved area, doors propped open, or unauthorized individuals using campus equipment or offices.) If it seems a situation appears abnormal to you in any way, report it.

Policy: Bullying & Harassment Policy

Bullying or implied threat, intimidation, sexual harassment and violence will not be tolerated at International College of Holistic Studies.

Weapons of any kind are not permitted on campus; this includes the International College of Holistic Studies building and surrounding parking lot.

The International College of Holistic Studies will address issues involving harassment or bullying in any form; student to student; student to faculty member(s); faculty member(s) to student; or faculty member to faculty member. All faculty members and students have a responsibility to cooperate fully with the investigation of an alleged bullying or harassment complaint. Bullying means systematically and chronically inflicting physical hurt or psychological distress on one or more students or faculty. It is further defined as; unwanted purposeful written, verbal, nonverbal, or physical behavior, including but not limited to any threatening, insulting or dehumanizing gestures by a student or faculty that has the potential to create an intimidating, hostile or offensive educational environment or cause long term damage; to cause discomfort or humiliation or unreasonably interfere with the individual’s academic performance or participation, is carried out repeatedly, and is often characterized by an imbalance of power.

Bullying may involve, but is not limited to; unwanted teasing, threatening, intimidating, stalking, cyber stalking, cyber bullying, physical violence, theft, sexual, religious or racial harassment, public humiliation, destruction of International College of Holistic Studies or personal property, social exclusion, including incitement and/or coercion, rumor or spreading of falsehoods.

Harassment is defined as any threatening, insulting, or dehumanizing gestures, use of technology, computer software, or written, verbal or physical conduct directed against a student or employee that places a student or employee in reasonable fear of harm to his or her person or damage to his or her property; has the effect of substantially interfering with a student’s educational performance, or employee’s work performance; has the effect of substantially negatively impacting a student’s or employee’s emotional or mental well-being; has the effect of substantially disrupting the orderly operation of International College of Holistic Studies.

Sexual Harassment is defined as intimidating, bullying, threatening or coercion of unwanted sexual advances either physically or verbally including by means of social media and / or technological devices. Sexual harassment can also include an inappropriate promise for sexual favors. Sexual harassment can take the form of crude language of sexual nature, mild annoyances / transgressions to actual sexual assault or sexual abuse.

Sex Offender Registry: Individuals wishing to learn additional information about registered sex offenders may check website information for the City of San Diego.

If bullying or harassment in any form occurs in International College of Holistic Studies, contact any member of the faculty of the International College of Holistic Studies or contact the Police Department to file a report immediately. The International College of Holistic Studies will do everything possible to assist in this serious matter. If such a serious offense occurs, it is important to preserve evidence of the criminal offense. Information regarding area counseling centers will be provided upon request by a student or faculty member. If an offense happens where both the accused and the accuser attend International College of Holistic Studies, both the accuser and the accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during a disciplinary proceeding and will be informed of the International College of Holistic Studies final determination of any International College of Holistic Studies disciplinary proceeding with respect to the alleged offense and any sanction that is imposed against the accused. Dismissal may occur following a final determination of said proceedings.

International College of Holistic Studies will work with students to change their situation (i.e., allowing the student to take a leave of absence or enroll in a later course) if a change is requested by the victim and the change is reasonably available.

This completes the consumer report for the International College of Holistic Studies. The International College of Holistic Studies is committed to upholding all operations and safety expectations. If there are any inquiries regarding this Consumer Report please contact Kieu Vo, Executive Director, International College of Holistic Studies.